Author Topic: Play clock in UIL  (Read 684 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ElvisLives

  • *
  • Posts: 2684
  • FAN REACTION: +126/-122
  • The rules are there if you need them.
Play clock in UIL
« on: May 29, 2022, 07:14:18 PM »
If you haven’t heard, the UIL reverted to the 25-second play clock, started on the referee’s signal, for Tries and for the first scrimmage down following a free kick.
Probably a good change. Now we won’t have the internal conflict between those that did it correctly, and those that refused to to do it right (to avoid annoying coaches, and, potentially, getting scratched). And to not have the dreaded DOG.
That will all be behind us, now.
We’ll need to educate the PCOs, but that should be easy.

Offline FWREF

  • *
  • Posts: 28
  • FAN REACTION: +1/-0
  • Without officials... it is only recess.
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2022, 12:18:35 PM »
Do you have a link to the UIL exceptions to 2022 NCAA rules?

Jimmy

Offline ElvisLives

  • *
  • Posts: 2684
  • FAN REACTION: +126/-122
  • The rules are there if you need them.
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2022, 01:42:29 PM »
2022 UIL Exceptions document attached.

Offline Official_21

  • *
  • Posts: 329
  • FAN REACTION: +9/-0
  • What on earth have I gotten myself into???
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2022, 04:48:40 PM »
Hopefully we'll get some refresher training and an update on this new UIL rule.


Offline ElvisLives

  • *
  • Posts: 2684
  • FAN REACTION: +126/-122
  • The rules are there if you need them.
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2022, 05:17:35 PM »
Hopefully we'll get some refresher training and an update on this new UIL rule.

The 40-second clock for Tries and the first scrimmage down following a free kick have not been around all that long - happened since 2017. If you were around before then, the UIL Exception returns us to those days of yesteryear. Both are simply 25-second clocks that start on the R’s signal. Simple, even if more time consuming. If we can get them both on the field and and near the succeeding spot, there won’t be much difference. But, once again, coaches will try to use this as a pseudo-time out, and some officials won’t want to push the issue, for fear of getting scratched (for doing the job right).
This change is, perhaps, not one to get in too much of a twist about.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2022, 06:31:31 AM by ElvisLives »

Offline Official_21

  • *
  • Posts: 329
  • FAN REACTION: +9/-0
  • What on earth have I gotten myself into???
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2022, 05:52:27 AM »
The 40-second clock for Tries and the first scrimmage down following a free kick have not been around all that long - happened since 2017. If you were around before then, the UIL Exception returns us those days of yesteryear. Both are simply 25-second clocks that start on the R’s signal. Simple, even if more time consuming. If we can get them both on the field and and near the succeeding spot, there won’t be much difference. But, once again, coaches will try to use this as a pseudo-time out, and some officials won’t want to push the issue, for fear of getting scratched (for doing the job right).
This change is, perhaps, not one to get in too much of a twist about.
I have only been a clock operator for the past three years (This season will be my fourth). Good to know the change isn't that much of a big deal.

Offline Official_21

  • *
  • Posts: 329
  • FAN REACTION: +9/-0
  • What on earth have I gotten myself into???
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2022, 02:06:53 PM »
Quote
32. 3-2-4-c-7 & 8
c. 25-Second Clock. If the officials signal the game clock to be stopped for any of the following reasons, the
referee shall signal (one open palm in an over- the-head pumping motion) that the clock should be set at 25
seconds:
 7. After a kick down other than a free kick.
 8. Score other than a touchdown (not the try).

EXCEPTION: 3-2-4-c-7&8
Change #7 to read: “After a kick down”
Change #8 to read: “Score”


I just want to make sure I got this exception down pat. If I am interpreting the exceptions correctly, nothing has really changed, as we have always done it this way.

I suppose this just codifies what has been done for a long time, even before I became a clock operator.

If I am incorrect, I am sure someone will come along and set me straight  ;D

Offline JasonTX

  • *
  • Posts: 2749
  • FAN REACTION: +106/-58
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2022, 02:26:34 PM »


I just want to make sure I got this exception down pat. If I am interpreting the exceptions correctly, nothing has really changed, as we have always done it this way.

I suppose this just codifies what has been done for a long time, even before I became a clock operator.

If I am incorrect, I am sure someone will come along and set me straight  ;D

It has changed.  Two scenarios comparing what we did with 2021 rules and what we'll do with the 2022 UIL Exception.

Scenario 1:  Team A free kicks to Team B and they return the ball to the 50 where the ball becomes dead.
          Ruling in 2021:  When the covering official signals to stop the clock, start the 40 second play clock. 
          Ruling in 2022 with the UIL exception:  At the end of the playing action officials will relay a ball in and spot it.  The referee will then give the signal to start a 25 second clock.

Scenario 2:  Either team scores a 6-point TD.
           Ruling in 2021:  When the covering officials gives the TD signal the 40 second play clock will be started. 
           Ruling in 2022 with the UIL exception: At the end of the playing action, officials will relay a ball in and spot it.  The referee with then give the signal to start a 25 second clock.

Offline Official_21

  • *
  • Posts: 329
  • FAN REACTION: +9/-0
  • What on earth have I gotten myself into???
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2022, 05:06:37 PM »
It has changed.  Two scenarios comparing what we did with 2021 rules and what we'll do with the 2022 UIL Exception.

Scenario 1:  Team A free kicks to Team B and they return the ball to the 50 where the ball becomes dead.
          Ruling in 2021:  When the covering official signals to stop the clock, start the 40 second play clock. 
          Ruling in 2022 with the UIL exception:  At the end of the playing action officials will relay a ball in and spot it.  The referee will then give the signal to start a 25 second clock.

Scenario 2:  Either team scores a 6-point TD.
           Ruling in 2021:  When the covering officials gives the TD signal the 40 second play clock will be started. 
           Ruling in 2022 with the UIL exception: At the end of the playing action, officials will relay a ball in and spot it.  The referee with then give the signal to start a 25 second clock.
Now I see the change. Where the play clock would have started on a 40 sec clock last season will now be a 25 second play clock.

The scenarios really helped me see the difference.

Offline ElvisLives

  • *
  • Posts: 2684
  • FAN REACTION: +126/-122
  • The rules are there if you need them.
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2022, 06:43:16 PM »
Now I see the change. Where the play clock would have started on a 40 sec clock last season will now be a 25 second play clock.

The scenarios really helped me see the difference.

In those two circumstances, yes. But there is still the 40 second play clock for regular scrimmage downs.

Offline Official_21

  • *
  • Posts: 329
  • FAN REACTION: +9/-0
  • What on earth have I gotten myself into???
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2022, 03:00:05 AM »
In those two circumstances, yes. But there is still the 40 second play clock for regular scrimmage downs.
I figured that the rules governing the 40 second clock has not changed, thanks for the clarification though.

Offline Official_21

  • *
  • Posts: 329
  • FAN REACTION: +9/-0
  • What on earth have I gotten myself into???
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2022, 08:47:39 AM »
I just realized, the change I have to get used to is to start the clock on the R's signal on free kicks and PATs.

The past couple of seasons, I have got used to starting the play clock once the officials signal a  ^good.

The big thing that will help me is, I always get to the game location early so I can have a pre-game with the R and BJ.

Offline ElvisLives

  • *
  • Posts: 2684
  • FAN REACTION: +126/-122
  • The rules are there if you need them.
Re: Play clock in UIL
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2022, 09:50:40 AM »
I just realized, the change I have to get used to is to start the clock on the R's signal on free kicks and PATs.


(For non-UIL folks that may be looking in, this discussion refers to game timing changes made by the UIL, for UIL (Texas HS) football only. Do not apply this discussion to NCAA football).

"On free kicks" is not a change. The change is for the first scrimmage down FOLLOWING a free kick. For that, the play clock is now a 25-second clock that starts on the referee's signal. This is reverting back to the way it was before 2018.
So, the 40-second clock is used for regular scrimmage downs, after the initial down of a new possession for Team B, or after the initial down of a new possession for Team A following any legal kick down, unless there is some administrative stoppage that requires the play clock to be set to 25 seconds and start on the referee's signal.

And, to clarify a specific situation, if there is a "A-B-A" situation, other than with a legal kick down, the play clock is 40, and starts automatically. Example: B99 intercepts A11's pass, then fumbles and A88 recovers while grounded inbounds. Ruling, A, 1/10 (or 1/G), spot of recovery, ready (40 and running). This is a new possession, and a new series, for A, but it does NOT happen during a legal kick down, so it is treated no differently than if Team A had simply advanced the ball beyond their line-to-gain (despite the change of team possession that occurred during the down).