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With change of possession and a single foul, you have three scenarios:

A fouls before COP -- B must decline to keep ball
B fouls before COP -- A's ball, enforce from previous spot (bean bag, end of run if fumble).
Either team fouls after COP -- pretend B was A the whole time, it's a running play, ABO applies.

If the COP was a scrimmage kick, then PSK may apply -- the goal of PSK is to transform a pre-COP B/R foul into a post-COP B/R foul where the "spot of the foul" (for enforcement purposes) is the end of the kick. Similarly, the 10-4-2 exception transforms a pre-COP A foul into a post-COP A foul during a scrimmage kick (although not mandatory, B/R can request a rekick). All of this is done to prevent "replay the down" when the down is a scrimmage kick.

If you have fouls by both teams, that's where things can get complicated, but things tend towards "double foul, reply down" if it can't be made simple. However, there's two basic scenarios here:

B fouls before COP -- double foul, replay the down.
B fouls after COP -- B must decline A's foul to keep ball, enforce B's penalty ABO (as above)

When you get more complicated things like multiple COPs, think clean hands (team in last possession cannot foul before getting the ball the last time) and team in last possession must decline other teams fouls -- if things get overly complicated, you probably don't have clean hands and it's "double foul, replay down".

UNS and Nonplayer are dead ball enforcement. This means you sort out all the live ball stuff unrelated to this, then start assessing the dead ball enforcement. There are some quirks (like equal numbers of UNSs cancel out and enforce the rest to prevent the 15 one way and half the distance the other), but nothing absurd.
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HL's suggestions are spot on. I'd start there for specifics. In general, however, I have a overarching philosophy to learn such things that (at least for me) is a good mental place to start from:

Every scenario is not unique. You do not need to memorize a million different plays or situations. Think about categories or a hierarchy and group plays together. For an extreme example, you wouldn't try to differentiate a running play if the runner went left vs. right vs. up the middle -- it's just "running play".

I'd start by outlining "Running play vs loose ball" then "Is the foul on A?" vs "Is the foul on B?" and you'll quickly realize you've covered 95% of all penalties. The confusing part is that we, on this forum, like to come up with wacky one-off plays that involve seven changes of possession after the coach makes an illegal kick and a dog intercepts a pass in the endzone... and that's not where you should start. Save the edge cases for last until you're very confident on the basics.

I don't have the time right at the moment to draw up an entire scheme for you where you get changes of possession and such, but I could do it later if you wanted -- but I'd also suggest you do it yourself first, because that's better practice on your part.
  I appreciate this, and please don't spend any time creating a schematic.  I have the basics I believe for the most part.  The multiple layer scenarios with change of penalties before and after change of possession etc are what becomes overwhelming. 
I'm also looking for an easy way to remember/understand UNS or Nonplayer fouls and how they're assessed, what and when do they offset double fouls, etc... 
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NCAA Discussion / Re: S-B Quiz 2023-01
« Last post by ElvisLives on Today at 10:17:13 AM »
I agree with the rulings on all these plays.

Thankfully, so did Shaw-Blandino.
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HL's suggestions are spot on. I'd start there for specifics. In general, however, I have a overarching philosophy to learn such things that (at least for me) is a good mental place to start from:

Every scenario is not unique. You do not need to memorize a million different plays or situations. Think about categories or a hierarchy and group plays together. For an extreme example, you wouldn't try to differentiate a running play if the runner went left vs. right vs. up the middle -- it's just "running play".

I'd start by outlining "Running play vs loose ball" then "Is the foul on A?" vs "Is the foul on B?" and you'll quickly realize you've covered 95% of all penalties. The confusing part is that we, on this forum, like to come up with wacky one-off plays that involve seven changes of possession after the coach makes an illegal kick and a dog intercepts a pass in the endzone... and that's not where you should start. Save the edge cases for last until you're very confident on the basics.

I don't have the time right at the moment to draw up an entire scheme for you where you get changes of possession and such, but I could do it later if you wanted -- but I'd also suggest you do it yourself first, because that's better practice on your part.
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NCAA Discussion / Re: S-B Quiz 2023-01
« Last post by lonnieritch1981 on Today at 09:31:28 AM »
I agree with the rulings on all these plays.
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Illegal Batting
« Last post by lonnieritch1981 on Yesterday at 12:32:05 PM »
Another very good, clearly defined reply. Thanks for the help on a rule that for some reason eludes me. Very helpful.
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Illegal Batting
« Last post by Legacy Zebra on Yesterday at 12:12:42 PM »
If the ball was recovered in the end zone by A, it would be a touchdown because they are on legal possession in Team Bs end zone. If the ball was recovered by B in the end zone and became dead there, the result f the down would be a touchback. Team As kick was the impetus that put the ball in the end zone, so they are still responsible for the ball being there. But if its recovered by B, it doesnt really matter where its recovered, because the penalty will still be a safety.
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Illegal Batting
« Last post by lonnieritch1981 on Yesterday at 11:55:51 AM »
Very well done...clear and precise...very helpful. Now may I presume that had this ball remained in the EZ and been recovered by B it would be a safety and if recovered by A it would be a TD?
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Illegal Batting
« Last post by Legacy Zebra on Yesterday at 11:37:40 AM »
The first thing to ask yourself on these plays is What is the natural result of the play? Then determine the basic spot, then the enforcement.

In scenario one, the ball is dead and A is in legal possession of the ball when they recover it. Because batting is a 3-and-1 foul, we need 3 things: When did the foul occur (what type of play), who committed the foul, and where the foul was committed. This foul occurs during a scrimmage kick play. So now we have to determine if it meets the requirements for post scrimmage kick enforcement. Because Team B will not put the ball in play next, PSK does not apply. So now we apply the 3-and-1 principle. The basic spot for a scrimmage kick play is the previous spot. The foul was committed by the team not in possession, so the foul will be enforced from the previous spot. However, Team A is in legal possession, so they would just decline the penalty and have the ball 1st and goal at the B-5.

In the second scenario, Team B is in legal possession at the end of the down. The foul still occurs during a scrimmage kick play, but this time all PSK criteria are met. So the basic spot is the PSK spot. The kick ends in the field of play when it is possessed by Team B and none of the special cases in 2-25-11 apply, so the PSK is the end of the kick. The foul is committed by the team taken to be in possession and the foul is behind the basic spot, so it is enforced from the spot of the foul. Since this foul is in the end zone, the penalty is a safety.

One other note, PSK does not apply in extra periods. So if scenario 2 were to happen in OT, the penalty would be from the previous spot just like scenario 1.

Also, this is NOT an unfair act. The NFL counts the field goal in this scenario, NCAA does not. It is simply a foul for batting and you enforce as above.
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Try 1) Reddings Guide.  2) Rules By Topic (Referee mag)  3) NFHS Rules Simplified & Illustrated

The first two break down rules in a topical format or by segments of the game- running game, passing game, kicking game, etc.  Reddings Guide has been the overall biggest help to me in my career.  Rule 2 has to be the first thing to go over as the terminology is important. Then Fundamentals, then Rule 10 is where you start breaking down loose ball play, running play, and kicks. 

We don't get the S&I rulebook with our packet anymore but it was handy when I started 30 years ago.
  Great info, thank you.
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