Author Topic: Old NCAA rule books  (Read 659 times)

Offline ChicagoZebra

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Old NCAA rule books
« on: December 06, 2017, 01:00:12 PM »
Does anyone have older NCAA rulebooks available to share? I am thinking of the 70s and 80s in particular, but even older would be interesting as well.

I was watching a Texas game from the 1970s on the Longhorn Network, and was interested to spot rules differences.

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2017, 02:24:01 PM »
I'm sure I'm not the senior, but my set goes back to 72. Unfortunately, I only have one copy of each (at least until much more recently).  But, I could look something up for you, if that helps.

Robert


Offline ChicagoZebra

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2017, 03:24:42 PM »
I'm sure I'm not the senior, but my set goes back to 72. Unfortunately, I only have one copy of each (at least until much more recently).  But, I could look something up for you, if that helps.

Robert

To be honest, I don't have any specific areas in mind. I was more interested in poking around in general. I feel like Rule 7 probably has some interesting changes - any that pop out at you?

Offline TXMike

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2017, 03:33:48 PM »
You might want to get book called Anatomy of a Game.  David Nelson wrote.   It is an incredible look at the rules of the game year by year

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2017, 04:32:02 PM »
To be honest, I don't have any specific areas in mind. I was more interested in poking around in general. I feel like Rule 7 probably has some interesting changes - any that pop out at you?

You probably already know this, but the Rules and the Interpretations were published separately back in the 70's, and each book was small (4" X 6", I think), and maybe 3/16" thick.  So, I can probably scan Rule 7 for you - probably only about 4 pages back in the early 70's.  I'll check tonight.

Off the top of my head, I recall that an incomplete pass into the end zone (or beyond) on 4th down resulted in a touchback.  Some folks might like to have that rule back. :)

Robert

Offline #92

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 04:57:42 PM »
Wow. I guess not much pass attempts were done into the EZ :)

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2017, 08:34:41 PM »
Wow. I guess not much pass attempts were done into the EZ :)

Forgive me, but my memory failed me.  It wasnít an incomplete pass in the opponentís end zone that resulted in a touchback.  It was Offensive Pass Interference and Illegal Touching by An Originally Ineligible Player in the opponentís end zone (any down) that had an option for a touchback, or 15 yards from previous spot and a loss of down (both fouls).  The touchback option was dropped in 1982 (for both).  The distance penalty for illegal touching had already changed (down to 5 yards), but the LOD was still there.  It is not LOD, today (despite protestations of one coach last week ::) ).

DPI was still a spot foul in 1982 - donít recall when it changed to the current rule.

It might have been the NFL that had the 4th down incomplete pass in the end zone = touchback rule.  I swear somebody had it!  But not NCAA.

TImes have changed.  Knee pads, socks, and jersey numbers were never an issue.  On and on.

Robert

Offline ChicagoZebra

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2017, 09:53:12 AM »
That is cool stuff and exactly what I was looking to learn! Thanks Elvis.

Offline bossman72

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 10:14:56 AM »
I'm sure I'm not the senior, but my set goes back to 72. Unfortunately, I only have one copy of each (at least until much more recently).  But, I could look something up for you, if that helps.

Robert



I'd say scan it for everyone to read, but I know scanning an entire book without cutting out the spine is a total pain in the ace.

One seasoned veteran told me at one time that the defense could not advance a fumble recovery.  They changed that in the 80's I believe.

Offline zebrablog

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2017, 12:08:24 PM »
It might have been the NFL that had the 4th down incomplete pass in the end zone = touchback rule.  I swear somebody had it!  But not NCAA.

It was an NFL rule, and it happened in Super Bowl V. It didn't last much longer:

Late in the second quarter with the Colts driving, quarterback Earl Morralís pass on a 4th-and-goal play fell incomplete in the end zone.

Under the rules of the day, on an incomplete fourth-down pass in the end zone, the defense would be awarded the ball by a touchback and start the series at the 20-yard line.

This was rare ruling from referee Norm Schachterís crew. The philosophy was to award the defense for a goal line stand by letting them start from the 20, instead of inside the 10-yard line in the shadow of their own goal line. The rule was changed in 1975 to be a standard turnover on downs, probably because the defense was rewarded too much. But the arcane rule was on the books in various forms since the early days of the game, with the original intent to suppress the passing offenses.

http://www.footballzebras.com/2016/02/01/50-super-bowl-calls-part-1/2/#43

Offline Etref

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2017, 07:31:32 PM »
I'd say scan it for everyone to read, but I know scanning an entire book without cutting out the spine is a total pain in the ace.

One seasoned veteran told me at one time that the defense could not advance a fumble recovery.  They changed that in the 80's I believe.

I believe you are correct. Most old vets at that time thought it was the end of the world
" I don't make the rules coach!"

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2017, 11:42:16 AM »
Attached are some pages from the 1972 book, that I think you'll find interesting.

Robert

Offline clearwall

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2017, 12:02:03 PM »
It was an NFL rule, and it happened in Super Bowl V. It didn't last much longer:

Late in the second quarter with the Colts driving, quarterback Earl Morralís pass on a 4th-and-goal play fell incomplete in the end zone.

Under the rules of the day, on an incomplete fourth-down pass in the end zone, the defense would be awarded the ball by a touchback and start the series at the 20-yard line.

This was rare ruling from referee Norm Schachterís crew. The philosophy was to award the defense for a goal line stand by letting them start from the 20, instead of inside the 10-yard line in the shadow of their own goal line. The rule was changed in 1975 to be a standard turnover on downs, probably because the defense was rewarded too much. But the arcane rule was on the books in various forms since the early days of the game, with the original intent to suppress the passing offenses.

http://www.footballzebras.com/2016/02/01/50-super-bowl-calls-part-1/2/#43
Seems like nowadays, teams could use that for an OFFENSIVE advantage. You get a chance to go for it on 4th and if you fail, it works like a punt anyway.

Offline ChicagoZebra

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2017, 01:33:03 PM »
Attached are some pages from the 1972 book, that I think you'll find interesting.

Robert

So a defender can strip a ball from an opponent and advance, but not recover a fumble and advance. I guess it makes sense depending on the exact definitions in Rule 2, but still a bit of a logic stretch IMO. Good thing that changed!

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2017, 02:12:20 PM »
As always, the devil is in the details.  A 'caught' fumble could be advanced, but a 'recovered' fumble could not.  That's 1972, so don't anyone working today get confused, please.

Robert
 

Offline RD88

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2017, 06:48:08 PM »
My foggy memory from playing in Texas in the late '60s (NCAA rules?) is that only fumbles behind the line of scrimmage could be advanced.  Of course, I was a mere pup then wearing a thin plastic helmet. 

Offline JasonTX

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2017, 07:57:02 PM »
So a defender can strip a ball from an opponent and advance, but not recover a fumble and advance. I guess it makes sense depending on the exact definitions in Rule 2, but still a bit of a logic stretch IMO. Good thing that changed!
The correct term is "snatch" or "steal".   ;D

Online Kalle

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #17 on: Yesterday at 03:32:46 AM »
Wasn't this in the books as late as early 90's? I distinctly remember this changing during my career. Or did it change later for PATs or something?

Offline Dakota Dan

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #18 on: Yesterday at 03:52:15 PM »
1990--Defense allowed to advance fumbles that occur beyond the neutral zone.

1992--Defense allowed to advance fumbles regardless of where they occur.

Offline fearlessleader

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #19 on: Yesterday at 04:12:18 PM »
Not sure about the fumbles, but as recently as the mid 90ís the defense could not advance a grounded backward pass.

Offline Dakota Dan

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #20 on: Yesterday at 07:18:00 PM »
1998- For the first time in the history of the college game, a backward pass can be recovered and advanced by the defense. Responding to the overwhelming support of coaches, the committee cited consistency as the reason it adopted the new rule (Rule 4-1-3-j).

Online Kalle

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Re: Old NCAA rule books
« Reply #21 on: Today at 12:21:38 AM »
1998- For the first time in the history of the college game, a backward pass can be recovered and advanced by the defense. Responding to the overwhelming support of coaches, the committee cited consistency as the reason it adopted the new rule (Rule 4-1-3-j).

Ha, this was it. Thanks! My rule book archive goes back only to 2001.