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National Federation Discussion / Re: Apple Watch 40/25 clock app
« Last post by CalhounLJ on June 24, 2019, 04:03:10 PM »
Any update on this development?
Got an apple watch for my birthday.  aWaRd
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There needs to be a mechanic that defines what and when exactly that is to take place or there will a lot of inconsistencies in the time of getting the players inside the numbers from one crew to the next.

Unfortunately, you are correct.  Let's hope the NFHS Rule Makers considered the potential for a new level of inconsistency when assessing the stark differences between 4 & 5 man crews (with/without 40 second field clocks) and 6 & 7 man crews (with/without 40 second field clocks) when deciding that the suggested inconsistency alleged with only 25 second RFP could better be dealt with by adopting a 40 second play timing, rather than strengthening the existing RFP mechanics and procedures.  Time will tell.
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Well, not exactly. The 40 second rule literally reads that while the play clock does start when the ball becomes dead (except for noted exceptions), the ball is not ready for play until the game official moves to his position. So, to answer the question, every player and/or substitute must have been within the 9 yard marks at some point between the time the official puts the ball down and moves to his position, and the snap.
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2-35 Ready-for-play signifies that the ball may be put in play by a snap or a free kick with 25 seconds or 40 seconds on the play clock.
3-6-1 ART. 1 . . . Play clock and ready-for-play:
a. Play clock:

1. 25 seconds will be on the play clock and start on the ready-for-play signal:

(a) Prior to a try following a score;

(b) To start a period or overtime series;

(c) Following administration of an inadvertent whistle;

(d) Following a charged time-out;

(e) Following an official's time-out as in 3-5-7 or 3-5-10, except for 3-5-7b; and

(f) Following the stoppage of the play clock by the referee for any other reason.

2. 40 seconds will be on the play clock after a down other than specified in 3-6-1a(1), and start when the ball is declared dead by a game official.

b. The ball is ready for play:

1. When the ball has been placed for a down and the referee marks the ball ready for play after giving the ready-for-play signal as in 3-6-1a(1);

2. Starting immediately after the ball has been ruled dead by a game official after a down, the ball has been placed on the ground by the game official and the game official has stepped away to position as in 3-6-1a(2).

These are the rules as they apply to ready for play. The time that the ready for play is blown by R is easy to officiate and has not changed from last year. However, the 40 second play clock leaves a lot of play in the interpretation of when the player has to be inside the 9 yard marks. A literal reading of the rule says the ready for play starts immediately after the ball is blown dead and after the game official moves to his position. There needs to be a mechanic that defines what and when exactly that is to take place or there will a lot of inconsistencies in the time of getting the players inside the numbers from one crew to the next.
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7-2-1 ART. 1 . . . After the ready-for-play, each player of A who participated in the previous down and each substitute for A must have been, momentarily, between the 9-yard marks, before the snap. (this is the 2019 rule book)

With the adoption of the 40 second play clock, there is no ready for play except for the stated clock stoppages. When do the players have to be inside the 9 yard marks with the 40 second play clock?

The ready for play does still exist. It's when the U steps away from the ball. It's going to be about the same time the R would have blown the whistle if a crew was fairly consistent with ball mechanics (10-15 seconds after the previous play ended. You'll still treat this rule from the philosophy standpoint of deception. If they aren't intentionally trying to hide someone out or sneak someone in late it's a talk to at best.
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National Federation Discussion / Re: A method for shortening halftime.....
« Last post by Magician on June 24, 2019, 01:09:44 PM »
In 1983 the 3-minute warmup was required with USC to the HC if not. While there hasn't been any proposal to remove that, there has been some discussion regarding it. If a team is straggling back on the field, if at least half are on the field ,with the rest a' coming, in Maine we say : "Ayuh, 'spect close enough." If both teams are not on the field once the scheduled halftime has ended, the 3-minute warmup clock will begin. We will then ask the team who has the choice what choice they wish, as it could have changed with the looming 15 yarder. 
As long as we can see them moving toward the field at 0:00 we don't worry about it. Sometimes it's close. Only twice have ever flagged a team for it and both times we had an observer. We knew we had to do it then, but they were both very obvious. In one instance the coach did it intentionally because he needed to yell at his team longer. In the other instance the locker room was a 7 minute walk from the field. I don't know why they went there because there wasn't much chance to get back in time.
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National Federation Discussion / Re: A method for shortening halftime.....
« Last post by Ralph Damren on June 24, 2019, 12:52:16 PM »
In 1983 the 3-minute warmup was required with USC to the HC if not. While there hasn't been any proposal to remove that, there has been some discussion regarding it. If a team is straggling back on the field, if at least half are on the field ,with the rest a' coming, in Maine we say : "Ayuh, 'spect close enough." If both teams are not on the field once the scheduled halftime has ended, the 3-minute warmup clock will begin. We will then ask the team who has the choice what choice they wish, as it could have changed with the looming 15 yarder. 
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 7-2-1 ART. 1 . . . After the ready-for-play, each player of A who participated in the previous down and each substitute for A must have been, momentarily, between the 9-yard marks, before the snap. (this is the 2019 rule book)

With the adoption of the 40 second play clock, there is no ready for play except for the stated clock stoppages. When do the players have to be inside the 9 yard marks with the 40 second play clock?
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National Federation Discussion / Re: A method for shortening halftime.....
« Last post by sir55 on June 24, 2019, 12:21:49 PM »
Whether they warm up or not is up to the team and and it's coaches. The case book covers this:3.1.1 SITUATION C:

Upon returning to the field near the end of the normal 15-minute halftime intermission, the game officials notice one team standing quietly in front of its bench during the entire three minutes posted for warm-up. The game officials: (a) start the game as soon as the three minutes have elapsed, or (b) inform the coach of that team that the team must actively warm up by running or doing some kind of exercises.

RULING: The game officials are correct in (a), but in error in (b). The rules book contains no definition of what constitutes a warm-up. It simply requires that an opportunity to warm up be made available.

Silly rule or not, it is our job to enforce the rules as written. If enough coaches and AD's don't like the rule, they can move to change it. We don't get a vote.
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National Federation Discussion / Re: A method for shortening halftime.....
« Last post by PABJNR on June 24, 2019, 11:37:23 AM »
Heís not saying not to do it, he is saying the rule doesnít make sense to mandate it. His point is you donít stop the game in the fourth quarter so a JV sub can warm up, they are responsible for their own warm up prior to entering. Nor is there a mandatory warm up prior to start of game.

Thatís all bossman is saying


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