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Granted we are fortunate in that coaches and ball boys learned to have balls readily available to the wings.  I didn't reset the play clock a half dozen times last year.

If a team was running a no huddle and we set the ball with less than 25, on the O2O equipment I said reset or the B told me resetting.  If the team huddled and was still in the huddle we probably don't reset, getting out of the huddle is on them.
I would say if they are running a no-huddle and you put it down with 20 seconds left, they aren't likely going to get close to 0 anyway so there isn't a major need to reset. But you can if you just give it a quick pump and the play clock starts right away. Be careful though if you do it in a time critical situation and the game clock is running. You don't want to give them an advantage in consuming more time due to a delay on your part. We may have reset a play clock 5 or 6 times over the entire 3 year experiment. It was usually due to some delay in getting the ball spotted correctly that created confusion for the team (i.e. where is the ball spotted or complete vs. incomplete).
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Granted we are fortunate in that coaches and ball boys learned to have balls readily available to the wings.  I didn't reset the play clock a half dozen times last year.

If a team was running a no huddle and we set the ball with less than 25, on the O2O equipment I said reset or the B told me resetting.  If the team huddled and was still in the huddle we probably don't reset, getting out of the huddle is on them.
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Except none of these really apply without a visible play clock.  When we're the only ones who really know when the play clock starts (actually a single official on the field keeping the play clock) then the debates, complaining, etc. will still be there.  As Al points out the "slow crews" are still going to be the "slow crews" regardless, 25 seconds or 40 seconds.  IMHO it will be far more difficult for the unwashed masses to figure out if we're being consistent with an audible RFP that also starts the play clock.  It's the visible play clock that puts all that to rest. 
Definitely true through the bulk of the game, but at the end of a game if a play ends with 52 seconds on the game clock and you don't start the RFP until there are 30 seconds left you'll hear it from the defense if they are trying to get the ball back with time remaining. Or if you blow it RFP with 45 seconds on the game clock you'll hear it from the offense. Either of those could definitely happen and probably do happen often. With the 40-second clock that issue goes away. It's just one of the benefits. With no visible play clocks you have a lot more flexibility outside of these situations to enforce the play clock. You'll still have that. But the time your watch is hitting zero will still be significantly more consistent than even the best crews using a 25 second clock.

Think of it like an auto pay from your bank. If you make your car payment manually every month and rely on memory to submit it some months you'll be early and some months you'll space it and be late. But if you automatically have the bank send it on the 5th of every month it's one less thing you have to worry about. That's essentially the benefit here.
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There wasn't any suggestion by the experimental states that the 40" clock would shorten the overall length of the game. A couple of positive points ,beyond the consistent pace, was the reduction of DOG fouls and the number of "victory formation" plays needed at the end of the game. We Mainers didn't have a visible 25" play clock and now we don't have a visible 40" play clock. Are we happy  ::)? = NO; Will we make it work  yEs: ? =YES.
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There are three other timing advantages for officials. First, the referee has to blow his whistle a lot fewer times during the game. Second, you will no longer be accused of cheating the defensive team by waiting to long to start the play clock at the end of a game when the offense is trying to consume time. Third, you won't be accused of blowing the ready for play too quickly and not give the offense enough time to get their play called and snapped before the play clock expired.

Except none of these really apply without a visible play clock.  When we're the only ones who really know when the play clock starts (actually a single official on the field keeping the play clock) then the debates, complaining, etc. will still be there.  As Al points out the "slow crews" are still going to be the "slow crews" regardless, 25 seconds or 40 seconds.  IMHO it will be far more difficult for the unwashed masses to figure out if we're being consistent with an audible RFP that also starts the play clock.  It's the visible play clock that puts all that to rest. 
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by ElvisLives on Yesterday at 01:43:01 PM »
Oh Geez.  What was I thinking?  I know what I was thinking.  I had the COP thing backwards.  Yes, if there is no COP during the down then the penalty may be added to the end of the last run.  Duh.  My stupidity is only exceeded by my embarrassment.

But, I will say that, as you allude, during his reign as Sec-Ed, John Adams included a touchback as a bona fide COP.  Probably contributed to my momentary lapse of reason, but no excuse.

Half the distance from the end of the last run, yields A, 1/G, B-3, PC=25, GC=Snap.

Robert :-[ :-[ :-[
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by Legacy Zebra on Yesterday at 01:17:35 PM »
Robert, a few years ago you would have been right. However, all personal fouls by B are now enforced from the end of the last run as long as that run ends beyond the NZ and there is no change of possession. This is in 7-3-12 as well as the penalty statement at the beginning of Rule 9. This change was made to bring all PFs in line with the enforcement for RPS.
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by ElvisLives on Yesterday at 01:12:36 PM »
And before anybody starts to claim the clock should start on the Referee's signal because Team B will not next snap the ball, 3-3-2-f Snap Supersedes Referee's Signal governs, which states that when incidents occur that would cause the clock to start on the Referee's signal occur in conjunction with incidents that would cause the clock to start on the snap, the clock will start on the snap.  The clock stopping to complete the penalty occurred in conjunction with the touchback, so the touchback supersedes the completion of the penalty.  Snap.

Robert
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by ElvisLives on Yesterday at 12:57:35 PM »
Whoa, Dudes.

Absolutely, this is not a case where the penalty may be added to the end of the last run, because, as Magician pointed out, there was no change of possession during the down (which was a major difference in interpretation between Adams and Redding some time back, but that's another story).

But let's step back a second.

-The foul occurred during the legal forward pass play portion of the down.
-The Basic Spot for fouls that occur during a legal forward pass play is the Previous Spot (10-2-2-d-3).  That rule governs unless 10-2-2-e-1 can apply, but 10-2-2-e-1 doesn't apply, since there was not a change of possession during the down.
-So, by 10-2-2-d-3, the Basic Spot is the Previous Spot, and, by the 3 and 1 principle, Team B fouls are penalized from the Basic Spot, so the penalty (15 yards plus a first down) is enforced at the Previous Spot, which yields A, 1/10, B-30, PC=25, GC=Snap (due to the apparent touchback).

Robert
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General Discussion / Re: Measurement mechanics
« Last post by TexDoc on Yesterday at 12:32:34 PM »
I feel the same about chocolate...

 ^good
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