Recent Posts

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 ... 10
11
NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by Kalle on Yesterday at 12:13:04 PM »
The four of you would have been right a few years ago before the rule was changed so that the fumble through the team B end zone does not count as a COP.
12
NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by Legacy Zebra on Yesterday at 11:11:50 AM »
Magician got the enforcement. Since there was no change of possession during the down, the penalty isn’t enforced from the end of the run. The clock starts on the snap because the result of the play is still a touchback. Just like if it had been a touchdown called back for an offensive foul.
13
NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by sirhoagy on Yesterday at 10:53:00 AM »
SORRY SORRY SORRY MISSPOKE!!!

Typed that while my brain was in another gear.  Let me re-state it....oy!


The argument we had was where A will next put the ball into play.  The question arose as to from where we enforce the penalty.

Four of us argued that the penalty would be enforced previous spot, two argued it would be enforced from where A fumbled the ball.

14
NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by Magician on Yesterday at 10:43:29 AM »
I'll start with the first response as to what we did.

Four of us stated the enforcement spot of the penalty is the end of the run (B-10) because the play would result in a turnover. 
The force that put the ball out-of-bounds was the fumble by A - no new force.  Had there not been a penalty, B would have the ball.
Thus, we enforce half the distance from the B-10, 1st/goal from the B-5 yard line, clock on the ready for play.

Two others argued that we enforce from the spot of the fumble as it's the end of the run, no turnover had "in effect occurred' (whatever that means), clock on the ready.

One just stared at us blankly.
I'm confused by your answer. You said the 4 of you considered the end of the run the B10 while the other 2 considered the end of the run the B6. Do you mean end of pass in the first one? That is never an enforcement spot.

The question here is the basic spot the previous spot or end of run. The foul occurred prior to the end of the pass so the basic spot is the previous spot. There is a special provision though in Rule 10-2-2e for team B fouls during a legal pass play. The enforcement spot is the end of the last run for personal fouls if there is no change of possession DURING THE DOWN. In this play the change of possession did not happen during the down (this is probably what the other 2 were referencing) so the penalty will still be enforced from the end of the run which was the B6. If B had recovered the fumble then the enforcement would be the previous spot.
15
NCAA Discussion / Re: Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by sirhoagy on Yesterday at 10:24:29 AM »
I'll start with the first response as to what we did.

Four of us stated the enforcement spot of the penalty is the end of the run (B-10) because the play would result in a turnover. 
The force that put the ball out-of-bounds was the fumble by A - no new force.  Had there not been a penalty, B would have the ball.
Thus, we enforce half the distance from the B-10, 1st/goal from the B-5 yard line, clock on the ready for play.

Two others argued that we enforce from the spot of the fumble as it's the end of the run, no turnover had "in effect occurred' (whatever that means), clock on the ready.

One just stared at us blankly.
16
NCAA Discussion / Penalty Enforcement, Start of Clock
« Last post by sirhoagy on Yesterday at 10:21:41 AM »
Worked a spring scrimmage this past weekend.  Had an interesting situation come up.  I thought it was straight-forward but the "veterans" were split on the penalty enforcement spot (which we didn't have as it's a scrimmage; we had a passionate academic debate afterward)

3rd-and-10 from the B45.

A1 takes the snap, drops back to pass, completes to receiver A21 at the B-10.

A21 is hit at the B-6 and the ball rolls forward into the end zone and then continues to roll over the end line.

During the play but prior to the pass by A1, B-77 grasps and twists A-50's facemask.

- From where do you enforce the penalty (and *why*), and
- When does the clock start?

17
There are three other timing advantages for officials. First, the referee has to blow his whistle a lot fewer times during the game. Second, you will no longer be accused of cheating the defensive team by waiting to long to start the play clock at the end of a game when the offense is trying to consume time. Third, you won't be accused of blowing the ready for play too quickly and not give the offense enough time to get their play called and snapped before the play clock expired.

Apparently, what's done is done, and in the long run may well prove to be "Much ado about NOTHING".  As for shortening overall game duration, this change ALONE does nothing to address any issues of inappropriately slow reactions by field crews (Only they can choose to correct those issues, themselves).  Crews that have already learned to effectively deal with problematically slow chain crews, distracted ball boys and other ancillary issues  will likely continue dealing with those issues to the best of their abilities (and frustrations).  The actual "pace" of the game will be set by the Officiating Crew, and will NOT INAPPROPRIATELY favor either team.  Teams will either respond to the pace being set and be prepared to play, or will have to deal with the consequences of not being fully prepared.

As for "accusations of cheating" or whining about any number of complaints, those same Crews, who have learned to effectively deal with "other ancillary issues" have likely gained experience in how/when to deal with "background static".  For those who have learned to listen to, hear and respond appropriately to the music, the "beat will go on".
18
General Discussion / Re: Measurement mechanics
« Last post by ElvisLives on Yesterday at 09:12:06 AM »
Sorry, I could not resist.

I feel the same about chocolate...
19
General Discussion / Re: Measurement mechanics
« Last post by TexDoc on Yesterday at 07:46:02 AM »
On my crew, we never have measurements.

Sorry, I could not resist.

 ;D ;D ;D
20
General Discussion / Re: Measurement mechanics
« Last post by ElvisLives on Yesterday at 07:05:48 AM »
In the “way we have always done it,” the R shows his back side to the camera/pressbox while he is observing the measurement, and has to turn around to face the pressbox to give his signal.  Nobody wants to see our backsides, especially when we might have to bend over a bit.  That’s also why Cs and Us spot the ball “north-south,” to keep their hind ends away from the camera.
And, as previously mentioned, if on the pressbox side of the chains, the R, himself, blocks the view of the measurement from the camera/pressbox, which is exactly the purpose of having the R opposite the pressbox. 
Again, if this works best for NFL/FBS folks, and there is no compelling reason to do it differently at any other level, let’s all do it the same way.  A side benefit is that the transition to NCAA football, and then to the NFL, for those guys that aspire to those things, becomes seamless and transparent.

Robert
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 ... 10