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The only timing advantage for officials is that on first downs in bounds, you can crank it back up right away without putting the offense at a disadvantage by having the play clock start early.

There are three other timing advantages for officials. First, the referee has to blow his whistle a lot fewer times during the game. Second, you will no longer be accused of cheating the defensive team by waiting to long to start the play clock at the end of a game when the offense is trying to consume time. Third, you won't be accused of blowing the ready for play too quickly and not give the offense enough time to get their play called and snapped before the play clock expired.
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The coaches weren't behind this at all and we were the first state to drive it. The actual impetus was our commissioner thought games were getting too long and the reason was referees who took too long to blow the RFP. He felt the 40-second clock would shorten the game. It doesn't have any real impact on the length. For every time you have a delay in starting the play clock with it stopped you also had delays while it was running. They wash out in the end. Blowout may be a little longer because you have less control over spreading out the plays at the end. But that has been minimal.

The coaches have no more control over the pace with a 40/25 as they do the 25. They can't do anything until the U backs away which will be about the same time the R would be blowing the RFP most of the times for a good crew. The difference is the amount of time left after that happens. Sometimes it will be 30 seconds and sometimes it will be 20 seconds. The consistency has to do with the end of the play clock not the beginning.

I'm sure your coaches are thinking they are going to be able to go really fast now! They'll want to snap the ball with 35 seconds left. The same thing happened when NCAA went to the 40 and our experiment started. They may have some plays where they can a couple seconds faster but that's about it. Most of the time they aren't ready until it's under 25 and often under 20.

The only timing advantage for officials is that on first downs in bounds, you can crank it back up right away without putting the offense at a disadvantage by having the play clock start early.
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You weren't the only state that has only been using just a 25 second clock. 49 others are in your exact same boat. It will be new to all of us. Some were against it but the overwhelming majority was for it.
I find it odd that you weren't using the 40 in MIAA since it has been in the NCAA Book for 10 plus years.
The NFHS had three states experiment with it for three years each and a 4th state that experimented with it for a year. Thats 10 seasons of football.
To the best of my knowledge, there were ZERO complaints from coaches! However, this stands to reason since the coaches were the driving force toward this change.
The coaches believe they will now control the pace of the game rather than the White Hat.  This is a true statement. The games will be more consistent. But, be careful what you ask for.
And yes indeed, We shall see how it works out.
The coaches weren't behind this at all and we were the first state to drive it. The actual impetus was our commissioner thought games were getting too long and the reason was referees who took too long to blow the RFP. He felt the 40-second clock would shorten the game. It doesn't have any real impact on the length. For every time you have a delay in starting the play clock with it stopped you also had delays while it was running. They wash out in the end. Blowout may be a little longer because you have less control over spreading out the plays at the end. But that has been minimal.

The coaches have no more control over the pace with a 40/25 as they do the 25. They can't do anything until the U backs away which will be about the same time the R would be blowing the RFP most of the times for a good crew. The difference is the amount of time left after that happens. Sometimes it will be 30 seconds and sometimes it will be 20 seconds. The consistency has to do with the end of the play clock not the beginning.

I'm sure your coaches are thinking they are going to be able to go really fast now! They'll want to snap the ball with 35 seconds left. The same thing happened when NCAA went to the 40 and our experiment started. They may have some plays where they can a couple seconds faster but that's about it. Most of the time they aren't ready until it's under 25 and often under 20.
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Keep our minds working...
« Last post by ElvisLives on April 16, 2019, 06:27:06 PM »
Yes, we should be bean bagging all fumbles. This play is exactly why we need a bag down. We need to know whether the ball went out of bounds behind or beyond the spot if the fumble. And for penalty enforcement, we need to know whether the run ended behind or beyond the neutral zone. Obviously in this case that wouldn’t be much of a question, but it could be on some plays.

What he said.  👆👍
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Keep our minds working...
« Last post by Legacy Zebra on April 16, 2019, 05:27:50 PM »
Yes, we should be bean bagging all fumbles. This play is exactly why we need a bag down. We need to know whether the ball went out of bounds behind or beyond the spot if the fumble. And for penalty enforcement, we need to know whether the run ended behind or beyond the neutral zone. Obviously in this case that wouldn’t be much of a question, but it could be on some plays.
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I think that more to the point is the "lack of consistency" that the teams will be seeing.  Here in MA up until now we have always had a clear ready for play signal with an audible signal (whistle) that indicates the ball is ready for play and the 25 second play clock has started.  Everyone from multiple youth football levels thru HS varsity is well versed in the mechanics and timing.  With an idea that we will simply start a 40 second play clock on the DB signal from the end of the previous down I can see a learning curve for the coaches and players who have been doing it another way for decades that is more of an issue than us officials doing it.
You weren't the only state that has only been using just a 25 second clock. 49 others are in your exact same boat. It will be new to all of us. Some were against it but the overwhelming majority was for it.
I find it odd that you weren't using the 40 in MIAA since it has been in the NCAA Book for 10 plus years.

I know the coaches that were at our first MIAA sponsored overview of the NCAA vs. NFHS rules differences had serious heartburn over the play clock issues and the related mechanics.  We'll see how it works out.   :)
The NFHS had three states experiment with it for three years each and a 4th state that experimented with it for a year. Thats 10 seasons of football.
To the best of my knowledge, there were ZERO complaints from coaches! However, this stands to reason since the coaches were the driving force toward this change.
The coaches believe they will now control the pace of the game rather than the White Hat.  This is a true statement. The games will be more consistent. But, be careful what you ask for.
And yes indeed, We shall see how it works out.
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Keep our minds working...
« Last post by bctgp on April 16, 2019, 04:16:53 PM »
do we still consider the end of related runs by Team A behind the LOS? We wouldn't have a bean bag down right?  Just trying to clarify in my mind.
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General Discussion / Re: Measurement mechanics
« Last post by ElvisLives on April 16, 2019, 03:42:39 PM »
I agree this is fine but it really depends on the location of the R. I believe we've always had the R standing on the press box side. That way when he gives his signal he's not doing it through the front stake, umpire, and back judge. If the R is on the press box side it really doesn't matter if the B is on the offensive or defensive side, but it easier if he's on the defensive side. If the R is going to be opposite the press box then it definitely makes sense to have the BJ on the offensive side.

Admittedly, this is something prompted by televised games - specifically, the NFL.  They want the R to always be facing the camera (pressbox side).  With so many FBS - and FCS - games being televised nowadays, the same holds true for those levels for certain. Even when there are no TV cameras (al ANY level of play), there is the pressbox, with PA announcer, media, and video cameras, etc.  So, if it works for NFL/NCAA, why not do it at ALL levels?

I'm not sure how the U gets in the way, if he is pulling the chains from the defensive end of the ball, as he should be.  If the B is holding the ball while kneeling, he shouldn't be in the way, either (from the offensive end of the ball).  To avoid the stake, as he is rising to stand upright, the R simply needs to take that side or back step toward the rear stake, look to the pressbox, and then give his signal.

Robert


 
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Keep our minds working...
« Last post by ElvisLives on April 16, 2019, 12:35:48 PM »
That is why Elvis made the big bucks!   ;D

Take the complicated and break it down.

We get paid? :o
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NCAA Discussion / Re: Keep our minds working...
« Last post by Etref on April 16, 2019, 12:14:48 PM »
That is why Elvis made the big bucks!   ;D

Take the complicated and break it down.
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