Author Topic: Clinic Topics  (Read 2653 times)

Offline the clown

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Clinic Topics
« on: February 24, 2018, 12:52:41 PM »
Looking for ideas for our All Day Officiating Clinic... We typically spend 2 hours on the field and 4 hours in the classroom.  What have you guys done in the past that keeps the members engaged and informed.

Offline FLAHL

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2018, 10:44:47 AM »
There aren’t many responses (yet) which leads me to think most of us come away from our clinics feeling a little bit underwhelmed. We can “check the box” for having attended, but what did we really get out of it?

One thing that I always like is the presentation and Q&A with a representative from the FHSAA. They are always willing to speak at clinics, and it’s great to get their perspective on officiating.

Another thing I like is film, rather than just PowerPoint or words. If you use Hudl, get some examples of good calls, good no-calls and bad calls to discuss with attendees. If you don’t want to showcase your own officials, you can get great examples from the Aloha Clinic. Just google that, and you’ll find them. If you have some money to contribute to our friends in Hawaii, I’m pretty sure they would appreciate that.

Another thing we usually do is have a couple of college officials address the group. IMO, this can be hit or miss. Most people learn a lot from the officiating philosophies at the higher level, but a lot of guys are turned off if the college officials preface too many statements with “I’m not sure about the Fed rules, but...”

We’ve also had Q&A with a panel of coaches in the past. Their perspective is usually interesting and the setting is pretty relaxed since it’s off season.  You’ll want a strong facilitator to make sure it doesn’t turn into a gripe session though.

Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2018, 10:46:26 AM by FLAHL »

Offline Etref

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2018, 12:46:37 PM »
Rules changes (be sure to include last years also) are always good
Position breakouts
Pregame activities/ conference
Kicking game
Passing game
Points of emphasis

All of these should be led by an experienced official and participation by attendees should be sought
" I don't make the rules coach!"

Offline the clown

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2018, 10:10:24 PM »
We have done all of the suggested. The last years coaches panel, like the previous years coaches panel, taught us that: A:  They don't know the rules. B: They wish we wouldn't spend so much time paying attention to the side-line or equipment.  We've had PAC12 Officials telling a bunch of fat guys the importance of staying in shape.  Video sessions right after a big lunch that puts half the group to sleep. (We're moving them to 11:00am this year) We'd love to talk about cross-field mechanics but it has yet to be included in the NFHS mechanics manual.  We realize, like many of your associations, that half the members don't want to get better.  I'm mainly trying to reach that 50%.  Keep the suggestion coming, there is going to be one or two we haven't thought of.

Offline Legacy Zebra

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2018, 09:29:04 AM »
My suggestion would actually not have sessions for “kicking game” and “passing game”. It’s way too broad. You won’t be able to adequately cover it all, assuming your individual sessions are 45 minutes to an hour. The discussion will be so shallow that the ones who want to get better won’t get anything new and the ones who don’t are tuning you out anyway. If you want to talk about kicks, talk about one or two specific topics. Talk about penalty enforcement on kicks (especially PSK), how to handle broken plays like missed field goals and blocked punts, stuff like that.

And as far as film, don’t have just one big film session. Each topic needs to have its own film clips. This serves two purposes. First, each topic gets its own examples so your guys can immediately process the what was said and pair it with what they’re seeing. Second, it breaks up the flow of the clinic. If you go back and forth between presentation and film, it keeps people engaged rather than just staring at a speaker for 50 minutes and then staring at a screen for the next 50 minutes.

Offline prab

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2018, 09:37:06 AM »
How about a session on major NFHS/NCAA/NFL rule differences: outside the tackle box; uncatchable pass; #77 reporting in as an eligible receiver; etc.

Offline BIG UMP

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2018, 11:48:12 AM »
We have break out sessions with each position having a position chief, then tandems of U/R and H/L briefly and then H/L/B.  Topics are easier to cover when you are focusing on one positions mechanics and responsibilities.
Big Ump
aka Shawn

"EVERY JOB IS A SELF-PORTRAIT OF THE PERSON WHO DID IT.  AUTOGRAPH YOUR WORK WITH EXCELLENCE."~unknown

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2018, 02:47:22 PM »
Mr. Clown,
Don't know how you do the on-field session(s) - with real teams scrimmaging?  Or, with participants simulating teams?  I've never been a fan of having real teams scrimmaging, because you can't control what 'looks' they are going to throw at you, and you can't 'stop' things to discuss issues.  Simulated teams works much better.

I am always surprised at how many folks really don't understand keys, and how to stay with them during the play (or come off of them).  Lots of them can 'tell' you their keys, per the manual, but they have no idea how that translates onto the field.  So very many just forget their key at the snap and become ball/ball carrier watchers.

One of the most beneficial on-field sessions that can be done is identification and observation of keys.  Using a group of sideline/deep guys, have the participants simulate eligible receivers, with just two or three DBs.  When the 'team' moves to their positions, have the 'crew' (H, L, B, or H, L, S, F, B) point and shout out their key(s).  Then run a play, and have a someone (A or B) commit an exaggerated foul as the play develops, and see if the appropriate official picks it up.  Run 'reps' of three plays per 'crew,' then rotate.  Keep this up until everybody has had three or more 'reps.'  Start very simple, and, as the drill progresses, have the receivers shift (after initial keys have been IDd), forcing the crew to re-identify keys.  Run simple pass patterns at first, then patterns that cause the crew to stay with their keys as they run across the field, etc.
It is a very satisfying feeling to watch guys flounder in their first rep, then, by the end of the session, they all nail their keys, and the right folks are looking at the right things at the right times.  Makes me jump and shout and scream "Yeah!" when they get it right, and you can see they "get it."

Similar can be done with the R & U.  Keys don't change as often, but they do change occasionally.  But, they need practice staying with their keys the appropriate amount of time, and coming off their primary key at the right time, to look at a greater threat, etc.

Try it and see what you think.  The trick is to keep things moving, so they don't get bored waiting their turn.  If there are enough participants, and enough field space, break into multiple groups, so they get more reps in the time available.

Robert

Offline Ralph Damren

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2018, 09:08:58 AM »
For an off-field session, may I suggest Rule 10 (Penalty Enforcement). IMHO, there are probably more rules errors in our state than in the other 9 combined. I do a review of penalty enforcement every year, and if anyone has the capacity to receive a FAX and post it here, I would glad to send it to them.

Remember, guys, what you see here is the outer limits of my technical knowledge...
 tR:oLl

Offline CalhounLJ

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2018, 03:32:35 PM »
Please Ralph, Fax mine to: (662) 283-5004
Thanks a bunch

Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2018, 04:02:45 PM »
For an off-field session, may I suggest Rule 10 (Penalty Enforcement). IMHO, there are probably more rules errors in our state than in the other 9 combined. I do a review of penalty enforcement every year, and if anyone has the capacity to receive a FAX and post it here, I would glad to send it to them.

Remember, guys, what you see here is the outer limits of my technical knowledge...
 tR:oLl

Ralph, thanks for your kind offer to share your efforts.  I've been trying for a long time to master Rule 10, but haven't been able to quite finish the task, so any additional insight would be, and is always, appreciated.  My Business fax # is 518-371-0512.

Offline stevegarbs

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2018, 11:09:56 AM »
We have learned over the years that while collegiate or NFL officials can be great to have as guest speakers at a clinic, they should be asked to specifically NOT speak to mechanics or officiating philosophies. Someone else mentioned the killer qualifier they use of "I'm not sure how you do it in high school but..." Because of that, we ask our speakers to tell us their personal story of how they got into officiating, lessons learned throughout their career, and plenty of war stories both good and bad. If they are willing to take questions (and almost all of them are), then the audience can seek additional insights.


This experience comes after too many lectures by D1 umpires on the 27 different categories of holding they are required to assign to each of their calls or how the short wings and deep wings have to work together to make sure each wide receiver has individual coverage from snap to catch (we are in a 5-man state). Enjoy the visit from a "celebrity" and learn from their career-long earned perspectives.

Offline Ralph Damren

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2018, 12:06:21 PM »
Yo, Yankee Al & Calhoun - tried to fax both of you around noon on 3-15 without any luck -my fax machine said "NO ANSWER". Please advise.

Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2018, 01:36:51 PM »
Yo, Yankee Al & Calhoun - tried to fax both of you around noon on 3-15 without any luck -my fax machine said "NO ANSWER". Please advise.

Confirmed there was a FAX problem on this end, that has been eliminated, so 518-371-0512 should be ready to accept your input.  Thanks for your "New Englander" perseverance.

Offline Navcom

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2018, 01:38:59 PM »
Looking for ideas for our All Day Officiating Clinic... We typically spend 2 hours on the field and 4 hours in the classroom.  What have you guys done in the past that keeps the members engaged and informed.
Most officials I work with are weak in " Reverse Mechanics ".

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J727A using Tapatalk


Offline Magician

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2018, 03:52:43 PM »
We have learned over the years that while collegiate or NFL officials can be great to have as guest speakers at a clinic, they should be asked to specifically NOT speak to mechanics or officiating philosophies. Someone else mentioned the killer qualifier they use of "I'm not sure how you do it in high school but..." Because of that, we ask our speakers to tell us their personal story of how they got into officiating, lessons learned throughout their career, and plenty of war stories both good and bad. If they are willing to take questions (and almost all of them are), then the audience can seek additional insights.


This experience comes after too many lectures by D1 umpires on the 27 different categories of holding they are required to assign to each of their calls or how the short wings and deep wings have to work together to make sure each wide receiver has individual coverage from snap to catch (we are in a 5-man state). Enjoy the visit from a "celebrity" and learn from their career-long earned perspectives.
I hear this complaint occasionally too when we have NFL and college officials speak at our HS clinics. My response to the feedback is you should still pay attention to what those guys say. Many of those philosophies apply regardless of level. Holding for example is pretty much the same no matter what level you are working. And there are only 6 categories not 27. Learning how they cover keys and switch apply in a 5-man game as well. The player you start with may be different and the number of players each official watches may be different. But how a back judge keeps a cushion on the deepest receiver or the wing covers the back coming out of the backfield to his side are very similar. I become a much better HS official when I started listening to what those guys had to say. And when I watch HS officials who do that complaining I see there are a lot of good philosophies they don't apply in their game.

Offline Ralph Damren

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2018, 09:13:04 AM »
If the following planets align , here's a possibility.....

IF you live near a D-1 school;

IF they host the season opener;

IF you can obtain contact with the officiating crew;

IF you have a friendly local coach;

......you may wish to consider this :

Several years ago I was called by a good friend that was a D-1 WH. They have to arrive the night before and usually watch last week's video of their game and of the two opponents' games. Where it was the season's opener, there wasn't any videos to watch. He and his crew volunteered to put on a clinic for us. I contacted a local coach, who volunteered to bring his team to their field and run any plays that we requested. Our crews came wearing their spiffy George Washington knickers and pin-striped shirts. The NCAA guys came wearing polos with the CAA patch (U-Maine's league) and shadowed each position as our guys rotated. This lasted for 2 plus hours and was only ended by darkness as the coach didn't have authority to turn on the lights.

The NCAA guys gave out comp tickets to our crew - it was on Thursday, so most attended.

We treated the NCAA guys to supper (some still call it dinner). They chatted with us at the restaurant for a couple of hours. It's amazing how small a tab can be IF alcohol isn't a contributing factor (NCAA guys can't drink the night before).

At our next chapter's meeting, we asked each member what he had learned. Each member had learned something---that's rare.

The game : Albany 3 - Maine o (not good defense, just no offense)

We sat as a group, and many commented : "GEE, they're doing what they said they do !"

 tiphat: OUR BEST CLINIC EVER  tiphat:

.....but the planets have to align... 
« Last Edit: March 07, 2018, 10:14:15 AM by Ralph Damren »

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2018, 04:50:31 PM »
Ralph,
A rare, but marvelous opportunity.  Had I been approached about something like that in "my day," I would have been more than happy to accommodate.  But, I have known some guys that would have feared they would be training their all-too-soon replacements, and would resist.  But, maybe those days have gone by, too.

Good story.

Robert 

Offline bama_stripes

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2018, 06:00:11 AM »
...I have known some guys that would have feared they would be training their all-too-soon replacements, and would resist.

I'd look at it as an opportunity to be training potential crew mates.

Offline Ralph Damren

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2018, 07:54:58 AM »
Orono, Maine is the northern most outpost/outhouse in the NCAA and very few of our guys ever venture the long journeys needed to move up to NCAA.

IMHO, working on improvements requires developing good habits.
 IMHO, it takes a month to develop habits, both good and bad.
  IMHO, the NCAA guys suggested good habits for everyone.

The habits that I learned from them were :

(1) The only time I need (as a WH) to run/hobble/limp up to the LOS is if a potential measurement may be needed. The other guys are covering forward progress and spotting the ball and don't need me. -Save on energy, shoe leather and the like for later.

(2) Playing wider and deeper gives you a better view than closer and tighter - it also reduces the chance of getting run over.

(3) Always put an empty 5-yard belt between any A player on scrimmage downs and continue moving that empty belt if you have a scrambling QB. When the QB gets behind you ,the play may not have a happy ending :
  (a) You'll lose focus on QB and focus on the B players closing in :o.
  (b) You'll probably need to guess, or hope for help, on : was it a pass or fumble? - was the contact legal? -was forward progress stopped ?  :o
  (c) YOU'LL PUT YOUR SAFETY  :bOW AHEAD OF THE ACTION :!#......

These have been my habits since...thanks, Jeff and his NCAA guys tiphat:

It's Friday, time for some lobster chowder :) eAt& :)
 
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 07:57:49 AM by Ralph Damren »

Offline KWH

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2018, 03:57:16 PM »
Ralph -

My fax machine spit out all 4 pages of your Rule 10 Sermon

Good Stuff

My thanks to you from the Left Coast

Offline ChicagoZebra

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2018, 04:07:34 PM »
Any way someone can scan and upload it? For us young whippersnappers without a fax machine.  nAnA

Offline Magician

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2018, 05:09:37 PM »
Ralph...those are all great tips for officials at all levels! Unfortunately state associations that aren't officials and only want to follow the NFHS mechanics criticize you if you each thing you mention. The NFHS manual could be updated with some of those things, especially teh deep/wide referee. If you have good wing officials you should never have a close measurement. They can rule the runner short or not, spot appropriately, and then signal to you the result.

A couple other good ones are free kick positioning and back judge depth. We should allow the deep officials on free kicks at the goal line or 10 yard line if a team can kick it deeper. If you are at the 20/30 and the ball threatens the pylon you'll be guessing on touchback/kick out of bounds. The back judge should be able to start 20-25 yards depending on the type of athletes and expected play. If you have speedy skill players, the extra 5-10 yards still gives him good coverage but a better chance to keep the necessary cushion.

Offline Sumstine

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2018, 11:56:17 PM »
Use of video to explain mechanics and philosophies gets you the most benefit in a one day clinic.

Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: Clinic Topics
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2018, 09:37:57 AM »
Use of video to explain mechanics and philosophies gets you the most benefit in a one day clinic.

Video can be an effective method to dramatize and summarize the important components of both mechanics and philosophies.  Unfortunately, video can also too easily descend into an endless (meaningless) discussion that a particular call was/wasn't perceived as "correct".

Video concentrating on pre-positioning, coverage, set-up, proximity, continuity of focus, viewing position and specific situational mechanic priorities( hands, possession/feet, redirection, grasping, etc.) as either benefits of, or deterrents to the call made are far more instructive than the validity of the call itself (of a play long over).