Author Topic: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules  (Read 1361 times)

Offline Tobes

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Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« on: August 08, 2018, 04:32:39 PM »
Starting in 2019/2020

https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/high-schools/2018/08/07/miaa-aligns-rulebooks-with-nfhs-standards/PaYONZeBzPxHRDhlNwQldM/story.html

The article seems to deal mostly with volleyball, but the MIAA wanted to make the switch across the board in every sport.

Offline Tobes

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2018, 05:28:31 PM »
Never mind, saw this was posted already. Sorry.

Offline ilyazhito

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2018, 04:07:29 PM »
Well, basketball is not aligned because of the shot clock. All the other rules are NFHS, but the shot clock rules are not aligned unless NFHS chooses to adopt it nationally by 2020.

Offline Tobes

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2018, 10:37:41 PM »
Well, basketball is not aligned because of the shot clock. All the other rules are NFHS, but the shot clock rules are not aligned unless NFHS chooses to adopt it nationally by 2020.

True. Point taken.

Also, the Globe article talked about a desire to avoid lawsuits as one of the reasons for the switch?

What could be a reason for a lawsuit? An injury sustained while playing with NCAA rules that may have been prevented by using NFHS rules or something like that?
« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 10:53:03 PM by Tobes »

Offline clearwall

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2018, 01:17:53 PM »
Not a lawyer or anything, but what is the reasoning for this change? I know the article says it avoids possible litigation, but unless there is a threat of one, what possible litigation could you have by choosing to use a specific ruleset over another? What about sports that DONT have an NFHS rulebook? Are you still under threat of litigation because of that? I dont see how that is a justification. "NFHS addresses sportsmanship, fairplay..." so does the NCAA. This seems baffling to me

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2018, 04:04:35 PM »
Not a lawyer or anything, but what is the reasoning for this change? I know the article says it avoids possible litigation, but unless there is a threat of one, what possible litigation could you have by choosing to use a specific ruleset over another? What about sports that DONT have an NFHS rulebook? Are you still under threat of litigation because of that? I dont see how that is a justification. "NFHS addresses sportsmanship, fairplay..." so does the NCAA. This seems baffling to me

Just a guess, but it seems logical: Blocking below the waist.  Massachusetts may have seen the potential for liability for an/some injury/injuries caused by blocks below the waist, even if legal as permitted by NCAA rules.  Not at all a stretch for an attorney to make the argument that the governing organization should have recognized the potential for injury due to such blocks, and either made all blocks below the waist illegal, or switched to NFHS rules. 
"This poor boy had his entire future stolen from him by this governing body, which chose to ignore the evidence, and allow actions that are obvious to any reasonable person as being clearly dangerous."  Or something like that.

Robert

Offline ilyazhito

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2018, 06:15:46 PM »
Why not NCAA rules with an exception for Blocking Below the waist, then?

Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2018, 05:34:21 PM »
Why not NCAA rules with an exception for Blocking Below the waist, then?

There are a significant number of differences between NCAA and NFHS rules, (Which are designed for Interscholastic level athletes, who begin to participate far below the Varsity level).

Offline JasonTX

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2018, 07:58:45 PM »
We use NCAA rules as young as 5 years old in Texas.  But our kids are far more advanced than other states.   :sTiR:

Offline carol1995

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2018, 09:07:34 AM »
We use NCAA rules as young as 5 years old in Texas.  But our kids are far more advanced than other states.   :sTiR:

They are bigger too, right?  Because Texas... ;D

Offline Etref

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2018, 09:00:52 PM »
And smarter! yEs:
" I don't make the rules coach!"

Offline bctgp

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2018, 09:58:06 PM »
Not sure I buy the change is likely due to potential lawsuits, especially as it relates to blocking below the waist. If that were the case why do we still have it in NCAA & NFL. There's a lot more money to go after there then in high school football. Plus Rogers Redding has consistently said the NCAA hasn't been banned because there are no statistics that show blocking below the waist creates a large amount of injuries. However I will admit as an official it would make our job a lot easier if it was not part of the game at all levels.

Offline Tobes

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2019, 06:40:13 PM »
Just a guess, but it seems logical: Blocking below the waist.  Massachusetts may have seen the potential for liability for an/some injury/injuries caused by blocks below the waist, even if legal as permitted by NCAA rules.  Not at all a stretch for an attorney to make the argument that the governing organization should have recognized the potential for injury due to such blocks, and either made all blocks below the waist illegal, or switched to NFHS rules. 
"This poor boy had his entire future stolen from him by this governing body, which chose to ignore the evidence, and allow actions that are obvious to any reasonable person as being clearly dangerous."  Or something like that.

Robert

I was talking with an AD last week and while the AD did not mention blocking below the waist, the threat of lawsuits was a concern because if someone was injured "because the MIAA was ot using playing rules written for high school athletes" that may be grounds for a lawsuit.

Actually, I think baseball, one of the other sports where the MIAA is making the switch, is the one where a lawsuit might have been more likely. Mass. currently uses MLB rules with some modifications (mostly allowing aluminum bats and changes in the substitution rules) and there is no rule limiting pitch counts or innings pitched as there is in NFHS rules, so I could see a situation where a kid blows out his arm and the family sues because there was no rule keeping the coach from pitching him too much. (Though Legion and other amateur groups use modified MLB rules and have rules limiting pitches or innings).

Offline Tobes

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Re: Massachusetts switches to NFHS rules
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2019, 08:12:36 PM »