Author Topic: New Official Position.  (Read 2859 times)

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Offline Joe Stack

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Re: New Official Position.
« Reply #25 on: November 17, 2019, 01:15:00 PM »
While I respect the different opinions offered here, I'm really shocked that no one offered what i think should be the REAL position that all new guys should master first -- Head Linesman. This helps accomplish 2 main things: it teaches you to work the wings (most important skill in football officiating) and teaches you how to do multiple things at once. Putting a new guy at line judge, frankly, is probably the last thing I would ever do. LJ, when done right, is the culmination of positions -- it is sort of the assistant Referee on the field. The LJ, when done right, is the most important position (certainly in 5 man and fewer and often in 7 man as well) on the field because the LJ should know everything that went on during a play. He may not know the exact spot if the ball is dead on the other side of the field, but he'll know that the ball is dead, probably whether or not OOB, 25 yards downfield (or whatever), whether it is a first down or close, the probable status of the clock, and anything else the R might need to know if he doesn't. Putting a new guy at LJ gives him the false sense that because he doesn't have chain responsibility, that his only responsibility is down to down spots, etc.

First year guys should work their first 3-4 weeks of games exclusively at HL, if possible. Then maybe a little U and even R in B team and jr. high games. By the second year, he can branch out into more U (if he wants), much more R, add BJ and then start learning LJ.

You may not really respect the LJ position until you're a crew chief and have a good LJ, then have one who's not so good like I did. Make sure your LJ is the best official on your crew, if at all possible.

As far as resources, all I can say is don't use the Redding guide as a substitute for the rule book. There are tons of Youtube play videos. Watch plays then go find the applicable rule and approved ruling or casebook citation. Don't worry about whether the play is HS, college, or pro. Just assume it is the level of whatever you're calling. If you're a fed guy watching a college video, don't get too worked up by the cut blocks if you don't see them regularly. Just look at other stuff on the film. You don't have to read the rulebook from start to finish to learn it.

Offline ilyazhito

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Re: New Official Position.
« Reply #26 on: November 17, 2019, 07:25:59 PM »
Ralph Damren did say that the 1st position new officials should do is Head Linesman.

I don't even have a Redding guide. I rely on the Simplified and Illustrated rulebook, and on NFHS/NCAA rules differences, as well as other publications by the Referee Training Center.

Offline Ralph Damren

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Re: New Official Position.
« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2019, 10:39:43 AM »
My concern on starting a new official at other than HL....

U - IMHO, holding is the most subjective call in our game + a new official may feel the need to throw  ^flag = not a good mix

L J - may lose focus if not a lot of action comes his way, may be tempted to move closer to play as no sideline duties

B J - the complexity of the 40" clock, the need to purchase another piece of equipment (ReadyRef), the responsibility of end zone = also not a good mix.

R - NO !!!

Offline ilyazhito

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Re: New Official Position.
« Reply #28 on: November 18, 2019, 11:33:03 AM »
That makes sense for places that use 4 or 5 officials for varsity games. I would also have newer officials start at H for subvarsity games (though officials who previosuly played lineman positions could be good as Umpires).

However, in places that use 6 or 7, the deep wings (F and S) are another good option for newer officials, especially those that can run fast. The deep wing positions teach the value of good dead ball officiating, because deep wings have to accordion in after every play to watch dead ball activity, and count the defense on every play. Deep.wings are farther downfield from the coaches, so they don't have to deal with the sideline craziness as much as the short wings. Deep wings  can also be partnered with an experienced short wing on their sideline and/or an experienced back judge to help them learn the ropes as they come along.