Author Topic: 10 Second Subtraction  (Read 1432 times)

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Offline bctgp

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Re: 10 Second Subtraction
« Reply #50 on: August 14, 2019, 03:54:52 PM »
I found the following in the 2018 Redding Guide (top of page 98). The 10-second runoff may apply but it depends on the outcome of the measurement.

22. There are 22 seconds remaining in a tied game. A helmet comes off on a play that ends near the line-to-gain and there is a measurement for the first down.
RULING: The 10-second runoff applies only if the measurement does not result in a first down, because the helmet coming off is the only action through play that causes the clock to stop.

Offline ilyazhito

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Re: 10 Second Subtraction
« Reply #51 on: August 15, 2019, 06:13:26 AM »
What is Redding's rationale for this ruling? To my knowledge, the 10-second subtraction only applies if the time-consuming act (foul by one team which immediately stops the clock or prevents it from starting, injury by 1team, helmet off by 1 team) or replay review is the only reason the game clock stops. In the play with the helmet off and measurement, play was stopped for 2 reasons, helmet off and measurement.

Offline Bigfrizz81

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Re: 10 Second Subtraction
« Reply #52 on: August 15, 2019, 08:50:47 PM »
What is Redding's rationale for this ruling? To my knowledge, the 10-second subtraction only applies if the time-consuming act (foul by one team which immediately stops the clock or prevents it from starting, injury by 1team, helmet off by 1 team) or replay review is the only reason the game clock stops. In the play with the helmet off and measurement, play was stopped for 2 reasons, helmet off and measurement.

Through play the clock stops because of the helmet coming off. The clock had to stop because of the helmet. It so happens that the play was close enough for a measurement to be warranted. Suppose the helmet did not come off and there was a measurement, if the line to gain was not met then the game clock would start on the ready for play. The clock doesn't stop for a measurement automatically, this has to be done by request of the coach or R. Bringing the helmet back into play, by rule the clock stops to allow the player to leave the game and then the clock will start on the ready. These 2 events just happened to occur at the same time. If the play left the ball one yard shy of the line to gain then this wouldn't even be a discussion. If the measurement determines there is a first down then the clock stops by rule so no need for the 10 second runoff because that would be the 2nd reason for the clock stopping.