Football Officiating > General Discussion

Hyaluronic acid injections for the knee

(1/2) > >>

HLinNC:
After my last MRI back in May, my surgeon mentioned this as a potential treatment for my osteoarthritis in my knee.
(He described me as "bone on bone" at this point.)

Has anyone tried it?  Was it effective?

CalhounLJ:

--- Quote from: HLinNC on July 30, 2021, 08:59:41 AM ---After my last MRI back in May, my surgeon mentioned this as a potential treatment for my osteoarthritis in my knee.
(He described me as "bone on bone" at this point.)

Has anyone tried it?  Was it effective?

--- End quote ---
They work for a while per an old linebacker on our crew. Will need to be repeated. At least thatís what he said.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Covid 22:
Once you have bone on bone the bottom line for me was pain and swelling.   I have had both knees replaced and even though it is a very painful recovery, I think it is the best thing EVER.

From the Cleveland Clinic website:

Hyaluronic acid injections
Use: Hyaluronic acid (HA) injections often are used when corticosteroid injections donít work. But they usually are approved only for use in the knee.

In some instances, doctors consider HA injections first if you donít have obvious signs of inflammation. HA also is a better option if you have diabetes, as corticosteroids can raise blood sugar levels.

Also known as gel injections, HA injections are chemically similar to your natural joint fluid.

When you have osteoarthritis, joint fluid becomes watery. So, this injection helps to restore the fluidís natural properties and works as a lubricant and a shock absorber.

ďHA is a cushion or a buffer against inflammatory cells in the joint,Ē Dr. Genin says. ďIn some cases, it can stimulate the knee to start producing more natural HA.Ē Some physicians also believe that HA helps reduce pain by coating nerve endings within the joint.

One treatment, which may consist of between one and three injections, usually offers symptom relief for four to five months, but sometimes up to one year. However, pain and stiffness will return. Most insurance companies only approve one HA injection every six months.

Side effects: Thereís a 1 in 100 chance of an inflammatory reaction, Dr. King says. However, this reaction is less common with the newer HA injections.

Etref:
I have the 3 shot series every 6 months or so. I am retired from the field and normal activities are great. I canít say what they would be with the constant pounding of running up and down the field

HLinNC:

--- Quote ---I have the 3 shot series every 6 months or so. I am retired from the field and normal activities are great. I canít say what they would be with the constant pounding of running up and down the field
--- End quote ---

I honestly think we're just trying to forestall TKR.  Three years ago at age 55 I said that if I could get 10 more years in I would be happy. I've never thought I'd be one of those guys in their 70's still working on the field.  Arthroscopy on my left knee two years ago and now this on my right has me beginning to wonder if I'll get there.  One of our white hats was promoted as our new RSO and I have been looking forward to working for him.

I went to watch my local HS play a 7v7 yesterday and I decided to sit up near the press box in the shade.  Going up was no problem.  Coming down had me believing it was going to be pretty embarrassing if I had to ask if some of the team would help me get down.  I eventually made it down but there were a couple of stops where I would have begged for an on scene cortisone shot.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version