Author Topic: Uncommonly enforced rules  (Read 2985 times)

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Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: Uncommonly enforced rules
« Reply #75 on: March 26, 2021, 08:57:13 AM »
Correct. But what I had was a ball carrier jumping directly over the head of a defender who had “broken down” and was crouching in anticipation of making the tackle.

If EITHER one, or both, of the defender's feet, or knees was the ONLY body part touching the ground, in the NFHS code, it is a foul for hurdling, which at the NFHS level, is considered inappropriately dangerous.   

Offline CalhounLJ

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Re: Uncommonly enforced rules
« Reply #76 on: March 26, 2021, 09:00:11 AM »
If EITHER one, or both, of the defender's feet, or knees was the ONLY body part touching the ground, in the NFHS code, it is a foul for hurdling, which at the NFHS level, is considered inappropriately dangerous.
I’m just wondering if you read the rule you posted on this very topic. Because it specifically says one or both FEET. If the opponents knee is on the ground its not hurdling.


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Offline ElvisLives

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Re: Uncommonly enforced rules
« Reply #77 on: March 26, 2021, 10:03:22 AM »
For those who may not have access to an NFHS Rule Book;  NFHS 2-22 "HURDLING: is an attempt by a player to jump (hurdle) with one or both feet or knees foremost over an opponent who is contacting the ground with no part of his body except one or both feet."

I asked because some folks keep referring to the 'runner' or 'ball carrier' leaping a 'defender.' It appears to me that the rule applies to all players, in NFHS. Maybe it would be better to just reference a 'player' leaping an 'opponent.'
Again, this is a significant rule difference with NCAA (and the NFL, too, I believe). I won't offer the difference, to keep from confusing anyone. But, if you are contemplating getting into NCAA football, or are simply spectating an NCAA game, please understand that the rule is different, so you may not see it called the same way.

Offline Derek Teigen

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Re: Uncommonly enforced rules
« Reply #78 on: March 26, 2021, 10:08:18 AM »
I’m just wondering if you read the rule you posted on this very topic. Because it specifically says one or both FEET. If the opponents knee is on the ground its not hurdling.


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yes Calhoun you are correct the rule book state feet or foot.  I had a game (as a wing) on a short yardage situation where it appeared the runner lept into and over a pile of linemen who were engaged and some already on the ground.  The coach of the defending team behind me was screaming 'hurdling!'.   I think that has to be a very tough call to make.

Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: Uncommonly enforced rules
« Reply #79 on: March 26, 2021, 10:52:19 AM »
I’m just wondering if you read the rule you posted on this very topic. Because it specifically says one or both FEET. If the opponents knee is on the ground its not hurdling.
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Thanks for your concern, and keen observation, which was correct.
 
A day, or so ago, I posted the exact verbiage of NFHS 2-22, for those who may not have had ready access to it.  Somehow my subsequent conversation and reference to this rule allowed the word "knees" to (incorrectly) infiltrate that response.

It's worth noting that there appears to be significant difference between the NCAA & NFL rules regarding "Hurdling" and that of the NFHS Rule, which likely takes into consideration both the Maturity and Skill Set differences between players at these respective codes.

One of the reasons, I try and remember to add quotation marks to any specific rule I reference, as such. Those stark differences between codes, as related to "Hurdling", unfortunately causes much of the confusion experienced by those not aware of the differences.

It's been my understanding that the rule "difference", at the NFHS level, is intended to dissuade players from considering/attempting to avoid opponents by jumping ("with one or both feet or knees foremost who is contacting the ground with no part of his body except one or both FEET."). 


Offline Magician

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Re: Uncommonly enforced rules
« Reply #80 on: March 29, 2021, 09:30:41 AM »
One I will add that I don't think I saw here is the momentum exception. We talk about it a lot in rules meetings and clinics, but in 20 years I think it's only happened once or maybe twice in a game. I've seen some video where passes were incepted very close to the goal line so there was discussion about whether the pass was completed in the end zone or field of play.

Offline CalhounLJ

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Re: Uncommonly enforced rules
« Reply #81 on: March 29, 2021, 01:55:25 PM »
One I will add that I don't think I saw here is the momentum exception. We talk about it a lot in rules meetings and clinics, but in 20 years I think it's only happened once or maybe twice in a game. I've seen some video where passes were incepted very close to the goal line so there was discussion about whether the pass was completed in the end zone or field of play.
I ran back judge for ten years and applied momentum rule twice in those ten years. Both on interceptions.


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