Author Topic: How to become a better deep wing official  (Read 985 times)

Offline Navcom

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How to become a better deep wing official
« on: March 22, 2018, 12:34:04 PM »
help me out here my brotherhood of officials. I have a field test in 2 weeks, I'm not sure what they are going to look at, but If anyone can tell me something I don't know, it is greatly appreciated.

SRM

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2018, 03:56:35 PM »
Presence.

Do you look good?  Do you exhibit confidence?

Technique.

Are your signals full and complete?  I.e., don't just kind-of roll your wrists near your head for a TO signal.  Get those arms extended overhead and cross your forearms.  Come to a stop and signal incomplete pass, with arms fully extended to the side, parallel to the ground, and hold for several seconds.
Do you move with purpose and deliberacy, and stay focused on the action?
Do you know your keys?  Hint:  You can't know your keys without knowing everybody else's keys.
Do you maintain priorities?  I.e., if you have a foul, are you able to continue to officiate until the appropriate time to make your report to the R?  Keep your progress spot (if it is yours), until someone else can relieve you.  Don't worry about the darned ball until opponents are separated and there is no real possibility of foul.

Hustle.

Hustle is not necessarily a sprint (although that is needed at times), but it is a solid, easy run, not a lazy jog.  Sometimes a brisk walk can be good hustle, and better than a lazy jog.
Close in with hustle to the numbers, toward the dead ball - or farther as may be needed - after as many plays as possible.  Check the action, then, when your presence is no longer needed, backpedal with hustle back to the sideline.
On COPs, hustle to your position on the other side of the ball.
Hustle will be noticed.

Be "coachable."

Don't try to show how much you know.  Just let the events come to you.  Some may think that asking a lot of questions shows interest and enthusiasm.  Observers can see through that, and know it is just an effort to "suck up."  But, a pertinent question or particularly astute observation at an opportune time can be a good thing.

Have a good attitude.

Be approachable to and by everyone.  If there are bona fide ball persons, chain crew, etc., don't be afraid to introduce yourself and be friendly.  They can be your friends, and we need as many as we can get.

There's more, but I'll yield the floor.

Robert
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 04:26:22 PM by ElvisLives »

Offline Navcom

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2018, 09:35:42 PM »
Why, thank you, thank you very much. EP.

Offline Kalle

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2018, 03:25:34 AM »
Again, not knowing what your current level is, here are some random observations I've made in addition to the excellent advice from Elvis.

Always close in after the ball has become dead, even if it is a QB sack. That way you don't forget to close in when a long run becomes dead on your sideline and you've retreated to the GL. Besides, it just looks so much better.

Communicate, communicate, communicate. Have a good working relationship with your short wing and the other deep officials.

Offline ElvisLives

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2018, 07:12:44 AM »
Again, not knowing what your current level is, here are some random observations I've made in addition to the excellent advice from Elvis.

Always close in after the ball has become dead, even if it is a QB sack. That way you don't forget to close in when a long run becomes dead on your sideline and you've retreated to the GL. Besides, it just looks so much better.

Communicate, communicate, communicate. Have a good working relationship with your short wing and the other deep officials.

 :thumbup

Offline Navcom

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2018, 07:36:33 AM »
JUCO, DIII, Sprinter

Offline ChicagoZebra

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2018, 03:58:26 PM »
As a short wing, I love when my deep wing calls out down/distance/LTG before every play. Makes my pre-snap routine a little bit easier, and helps ensure I never have to look behind my back to see if we made the LTG or not.

Offline bossman72

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2018, 11:07:03 PM »
As a short wing, I love when my deep wing calls out down/distance/LTG before every play. Makes my pre-snap routine a little bit easier, and helps ensure I never have to look behind my back to see if we made the LTG or not.

I'm pretty bad with communicating the down or yard line with my deep wing.  I'm doing so many things presnap and watching for subs that it doesn't even cross my mind to communicate to him.  I don't need something else dividing my attention where it's, IMO, not really needed.  I'm always checking the down box whether it's behind me or across the field very diligently.  Really, all officials should be checking the down box for down confirmation as their only check during the down.  This makes sure everyone is on the same page and that the down box is correct.  IMO, communicating that stuff to the deep wing is kind of redundant and not really needed.  Not a bad thing by any means if this is part of your routine though!  None of my deep wings have really complained to me about it, because they have stuff to do too.

To illustrate my point: I was working R as a fill in one game.  The LJ was giving the down to the deep wing and he was physically turning his head to the FJ and they would both make eye contact and confirm the down.  Well, while that was happening (only a second or two), they were missing subs coming off of the sideline behind him while his head was turned.  I was the only person picking up subs on their side the whole game.

Now, when we get inside the 10, just about every down I'm communicating "my goal line" or "your goal line" with the deep wing, as that's very important for positioning. Likewise, outside the 10, I think it's a little silly to communicate who has the goal line because it's obvious.

Offline ilyazhito

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Re: How to become a better deep wing official
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2018, 04:31:12 PM »
JUCO, DIII, Sprinter

What does that mean? I understand that DIII and JUCO are levels of college play (the smallest 4-year colleges/universities are in DIII of the NCAA, and 2-year colleges are considered junior college and (usually) fall under the auspices of NJCAA), and that Sprint is a type of football for lightweight players.

I would assume that your comment also means that a good deep wing needs to know how to run fast, especially when fading back to the goal line on deep pass plays or long runs.

Correct me if I'm wrong.

Ilya Zhitomirskiy