Author Topic: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019  (Read 560 times)

Offline Badger1

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I just noticed the NFHS posted on their website the General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators for 2019.

Offline HLinNC

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Got a link?  I don't see it. nm  The Fed could really use some help in cleaning up and making their website more user friendly.

http://www.nfhs.org/sports-resource-content/general-instructions-for-football-game-and-play-clock-operators-2019/
« Last Edit: April 14, 2019, 07:22:18 AM by HLinNC »

Offline ElvisLives

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Interesting, the difference between NCAA and NFHS with regard to the use/non-use of the whistle by the R when re-starting the game clock after the award of a new series to Team A, inbounds (typically, by advancing to/beyond the line-to gain).  Redding directed NCAA officials to sound their whistle in such cases (see 2012 CFO Bulletin No. 1, Play Situation 2).  NFHS very clearly directs no whistle.  I have always preferred to sound it, if for other reason than not having to remember when to not sound it.  May be a weak reason.  But the reason to NOT sound it is...what?  Haven't quite figured that out, either.  Sounding it can certainly be helpful to a Clock Operator (smaller venues, I grant you).

More of a mole hill.  Certainly not a mountain.  But curious.

Robert 

Offline Magician

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Interesting, the difference between NCAA and NFHS with regard to the use/non-use of the whistle by the R when re-starting the game clock after the award of a new series to Team A, inbounds (typically, by advancing to/beyond the line-to gain).  Redding directed NCAA officials to sound their whistle in such cases (see 2012 CFO Bulletin No. 1, Play Situation 2).  NFHS very clearly directs no whistle.  I have always preferred to sound it, if for other reason than not having to remember when to not sound it.  May be a weak reason.  But the reason to NOT sound it is...what?  Haven't quite figured that out, either.  Sounding it can certainly be helpful to a Clock Operator (smaller venues, I grant you).

More of a mole hill.  Certainly not a mountain.  But curious.

Robert 
NCAA went back and forth on that the first couple years of the 40-second play clock. I believe now it's supervisor or personal preference. I like a quick whistle when the game clock is starting so everyone knows the game clock is starting again. But it's not really necessary. The clock operator should know it will be starting shortly after the line to gain is reached so keep an eye on the R. I think the reason against it is it could confuse the offense into thinking there is an issue since the ball may already be ready for play if the U is able to get it down quickly.

Offline NVFOA_Ump

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A bit confused by the document.  It was pointed out by our board interpreter that the section detailing the 40/25 clock operation (Section E. Play Clock Procedures) explicitly states that it applies ".. if and when visible play clocks are available to be used."  His (and several other board interpreters) read of this is that if we don't have a visible play clock, that the 2018 25 second play clock will apply all game.  Several of the RI officials that I worked with last season also said that they have been told that the 40 second clock only applies to sites with visible play clocks.  Is the document simply poorly worded??
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Offline Morningrise

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NCAA went back and forth on that the first couple years of the 40-second play clock. I believe now it's supervisor or personal preference.

Supervisor/personal preference is indeed my understanding - I asked this at a couple of NCAA clinics this spring and found no consensus among Rs.

I was originally taught, "blow the whistle when starting either clock." Which is a highly sensible way to remember it, and it's fine by my college supervisor, so that's what I'll keep doing. Since I'm new to NFHS, can you tell me if that also an accurate summary of the NFHS mechanics?

From the document: "There is no signal/whistle from the referee during the 40 seconds except to restart the game clock following a first down inbounds. It is important to note that none of the situations listed above involve an administrative stop/interruption in play. All of those possibilities are addressed in the next section."

Given the NFHS rule of not starting the GC after OOB, the document sounds consistent with my maxim, "blow the whistle when starting either clock." Is there a counterexample I'm not thinking of?


P.S. I have a caveat about this part: "(a) Always set the play clock back to 40 during a down in progress. You will have plenty of time to change it back to 25 at the end of the down if necessary."

If the ball is snapped very close to 0 seconds on the PC, the PCO should leave the clock at 0 for several seconds until certain that there is no foul for DOG. Should the B shut the play down and report a DOG foul, it looks better if the visible clock is showing a big fat 0. So don't reset to 40 until we're sure that the snap happened in time.

Offline Magician

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Supervisor/personal preference is indeed my understanding - I asked this at a couple of NCAA clinics this spring and found no consensus among Rs.

I was originally taught, "blow the whistle when starting either clock." Which is a highly sensible way to remember it, and it's fine by my college supervisor, so that's what I'll keep doing. Since I'm new to NFHS, can you tell me if that also an accurate summary of the NFHS mechanics?

From the document: "There is no signal/whistle from the referee during the 40 seconds except to restart the game clock following a first down inbounds. It is important to note that none of the situations listed above involve an administrative stop/interruption in play. All of those possibilities are addressed in the next section."

Given the NFHS rule of not starting the GC after OOB, the document sounds consistent with my maxim, "blow the whistle when starting either clock." Is there a counterexample I'm not thinking of?
Your caveat does apply if that's the way the mechanic book ultimately states it. In our experiment they told our R not to blow if he's only winding the game clock after a first down in bounds. It did occasionally create issues with game clock operators not starting it, but it's possible they would have had issues with or without the whistle.

P.S. I have a caveat about this part: "(a) Always set the play clock back to 40 during a down in progress. You will have plenty of time to change it back to 25 at the end of the down if necessary."

If the ball is snapped very close to 0 seconds on the PC, the PCO should leave the clock at 0 for several seconds until certain that there is no foul for DOG. Should the B shut the play down and report a DOG foul, it looks better if the visible clock is showing a big fat 0. So don't reset to 40 until we're sure that the snap happened in time.
I have no issue with that. I never got into the weeds far enough to know if we gave any guidance. The controls I've used are either a button or toggle switch so it takes less than a second to reset it. They could do it after every play and still be fine. I wouldn't get too technical on that.

Online Ralph Damren

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A bit confused by the document.  It was pointed out by our board interpreter that the section detailing the 40/25 clock operation (Section E. Play Clock Procedures) explicitly states that it applies ".. if and when visible play clocks are available to be used."  His (and several other board interpreters) read of this is that if we don't have a visible play clock, that the 2018 25 second play clock will apply all game.  Several of the RI officials that I worked with last season also said that they have been told that the 40 second clock only applies to sites with visible play clocks.  Is the document simply poorly worded??
MY reading of that (I wish I could agree with you) is you won't need play clock operators if you don't have visible play clocks. The back judge is the lucky one who assumes the duties. I've instructed our guys to use the Indiana experimental instructions. Their only exception is for sub-varsity with less then five officials, it would be done the ole' fashioned way.

Offline NVFOA_Ump

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MY reading of that (I wish I could agree with you) is you won't need play clock operators if you don't have visible play clocks. The back judge is the lucky one who assumes the duties. I've instructed our guys to use the Indiana experimental instructions. Their only exception is for sub-varsity with less then five officials, it would be done the ole' fashioned way.

So is it to be expected that the NFHS will correct the document to eliminate the language that states that the remainder of Section E does not apply if you do not have a visible play clock?  Or alternately at least issue a clarification since we won't be getting new rule books this year?  The way it reads now is clearly incorrect if it is intended to apply to all situations (visible play clock or not).
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Online Ralph Damren

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So is it to be expected that the NFHS will correct the document to eliminate the language that states that the remainder of Section E does not apply if you do not have a visible play clock?  Or alternately at least issue a clarification since we won't be getting new rule books this year?  The way it reads now is clearly incorrect if it is intended to apply to all situations (visible play clock or not).
I believe the document was an advice sheet for game and play clock operators and merely stated that it doesn't apply to play clock operators if there aren't any visible  play clocks for them to operate. Could it have been worded better ---possibility. I assume responsibility for this, as a member of the Game Officials Manual Committee, I watched Emails shoot by on this topic but was more interested it if the Patriots would again win the New England Invitational.  :)

Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2019, 12:53:57 PM »
Problems associated with implementations of "confusing and complicated" procedural modifications and adjustments can best be mitigated by carefully developed and presented detailed, and well explained, instructions.  Hopefully, although that that has yet to be provided for the conversion to a 40 second play clock, relevant instructions and mechanic revisions will be released in a timely manner long enough preceding the 2019 Season to provide ample opportunity to apply these revisions prior to play beginning, in the multiple configurations necessary.

Unlike other levels of American football, a majority of Interscholastic playing facilities currently subject to NFHS Rules, DO NOT routinely provide "Field-Level play clocks", presenting the challenge of incorporating these revisions from a field level, which in many circumstances will be managed by a variety of 3, 4 and 5 man field officiating crews. 

Considering the variety of circumstances subject to this timing revision, instructional mechanics protocols, as far in advance of game application, becomes more of a necessity to avoid confusion and interruption.  This is a classic example of "One size not fitting ALL", and it seems unrealistic that anticipated consistency in the various venues will occur prior to the 2019 season, Nationwide.

Perhaps the existing alternative, to revising the entire "play clock" application, of appropriately tightening existing mechanics, and timing procedures, to reduce and/or eliminate those unnecessary and excessive delays allowed to persist due to currently ineffective, but correctable, game management lapses and lack of officiating supervision  and enforcement should be addressed more directly, consistently and emphatically to accomplish equal, or better, improvements in overall duration of game time, to address the objective, to address the issue of extended game duration.   

Offline Magician

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2019, 01:06:52 PM »
Problems associated with implementations of "confusing and complicated" procedural modifications and adjustments can best be mitigated by carefully developed and presented detailed, and well explained, instructions.  Hopefully, although that that has yet to be provided for the conversion to a 40 second play clock, relevant instructions and mechanic revisions will be released in a timely manner long enough preceding the 2019 Season to provide ample opportunity to apply these revisions prior to play beginning, in the multiple configurations necessary.

Unlike other levels of American football, a majority of Interscholastic playing facilities currently subject to NFHS Rules, DO NOT routinely provide "Field-Level play clocks", presenting the challenge of incorporating these revisions from a field level, which in many circumstances will be managed by a variety of 3, 4 and 5 man field officiating crews. 

Considering the variety of circumstances subject to this timing revision, instructional mechanics protocols, as far in advance of game application, becomes more of a necessity to avoid confusion and interruption.  This is a classic example of "One size not fitting ALL", and it seems unrealistic that anticipated consistency in the various venues will occur prior to the 2019 season, Nationwide.

Perhaps the existing alternative, to revising the entire "play clock" application, of appropriately tightening existing mechanics, and timing procedures, to reduce and/or eliminate those unnecessary and excessive delays allowed to persist due to currently ineffective, but correctable, game management lapses and lack of officiating supervision  and enforcement should be addressed more directly, consistently and emphatically to accomplish equal, or better, improvements in overall duration of game time, to address the objective, to address the issue of extended game duration.   

Even the best, most consistent crews will vary 4-8 seconds throughout the game so even if you address those extreme issues you'll still be inconsistent. This will ensure consistency throughout the game. We only had a 1-page summary provided to us when we started our experiment and it was put together by someone who didn't have a lot of experience in officiating. We've had very few issues though. Most of the sky-is-falling concerns were the same concerns I heard when we adopted it in NCAA and our experiment and there were very few issues with either implementation. If you have major issues with clock operators before you'll have major issues now as well. This doesn't address clock operator incompetence. I trust you are a knowledgeable clock operator so you'll be just fine.

Offline AlUpstateNY

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2019, 02:22:45 PM »
Even the best, most consistent crews will vary 4-8 seconds throughout the game so even if you address those extreme issues you'll still be inconsistent. This will ensure consistency throughout the game. 

The concern is not necessarily with the most consistent crews, or the 4-8 second improvements.  NFHS rules govern Varsity games, serviced by the most consistent crews, at fields that do not provide "Field Play clocks" that are officiated by 5, and sometimes 4 man crews, Sub-Varsity games that are serviced PRIMARILY by 4 man crews and occasional 5 man crews,  and a variety of Youth Football contests serviced by 3, 4 and 5 man crews that DO NOT generally operate with the benefit of "Field Play Clocks"or Clock Operators.

Many (most, all) unnecessary timing delays could be minimized by re-emphasizing/adjusting/reinforcing existing rules, or changing rules related to specific timing issues (starting clock on RFP, after OOB, incl continual 1st down, consistent RFP application, (esp) after scores, etc), clock start on RFP after incomplete passes (to avoid/minimize detailed strategy reviews after EVERY pass) etc.

Modifying/adjusting rules that are appropriate and effective for all levels of the (Interscholastic) game will generate far more consistence than adjustments that will likely only address limited levels of the game based on the features of the venue at which the game is played.

Offline NVFOA_Ump

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2019, 02:56:44 PM »
I think that more to the point is the "lack of consistency" that the teams will be seeing.  Here in MA up until now we have always had a clear ready for play signal with an audible signal (whistle) that indicates the ball is ready for play and the 25 second play clock has started.  Everyone from multiple youth football levels thru HS varsity is well versed in the mechanics and timing.  With an idea that we will simply start a 40 second play clock on the DB signal from the end of the previous down I can see a learning curve for the coaches and players who have been doing it another way for decades that is more of an issue than us officials doing it.  I know the coaches that were at our first MIAA sponsored overview of the NCAA vs. NFHS rules differences had serious heartburn over the play clock issues and the related mechanics.  We'll see how it works out.   :)
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Offline Magician

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2019, 05:22:21 PM »
I think that more to the point is the "lack of consistency" that the teams will be seeing.  Here in MA up until now we have always had a clear ready for play signal with an audible signal (whistle) that indicates the ball is ready for play and the 25 second play clock has started.  Everyone from multiple youth football levels thru HS varsity is well versed in the mechanics and timing.  With an idea that we will simply start a 40 second play clock on the DB signal from the end of the previous down I can see a learning curve for the coaches and players who have been doing it another way for decades that is more of an issue than us officials doing it.  I know the coaches that were at our first MIAA sponsored overview of the NCAA vs. NFHS rules differences had serious heartburn over the play clock issues and the related mechanics.  We'll see how it works out.   :)
The benefit of the 40-second play clock provides the consistent for every play. They maybe had a rhythm from whistle to dead ball but with variation even from the best crews from dead ball to whistle affected them. If they had a series of plays where that was consistently 40-45 seconds (still variable) and they suddenly had one where it was only 35 seconds because the ball was placed quickly and the R started the play clock, they are going to feel rushed. Or you are the end of the game and the defense wants to get the ball back, they are going to feel you are taking too much time to blow the RFP. That goes away with a 40-second play clock. Your comments actually are one of the key reasons to support a 40-second play clock. They will now have a consistent rhythm automatically throughout the game because the time they have to get the ball snapped will be the same throughout (assuming no administrative stops for penalty enforcement, injury, measurement, etc.). It won't be 38 seconds one play, 44 seconds the next play, then 40 and occasionally 32 or 50. It will always be 40 seconds. This has very little to do with how QUICKLY they can snap it after the previous play although you will see plenty of chatter about that before the season starts. Then they'll realize they can't get a play called and started that fast. Very rarely will see you the ball snapped with more than 28 seconds on the play clock. Most are still in the 10-20 range.

Offline KWH

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2019, 09:04:55 PM »
So is it to be expected that the NFHS will correct the document to eliminate the language that states that the remainder of Section E does not apply if you do not have a visible play clock?

No, Not necessarily.
If you don't have visible play clocks you won't use the document. It's that simple.
It most certainly does not state anywhere that if you don't have visible play clocks you revert to using use a 2018 Rules Book and  25 second clock only.
 
Or alternately at least issue a clarification since we won't be getting new rule books this year? 

Sounds like you may have received bad information as the NFHS issues Rules Book EVERY year so there will be a new on for 2019.

The way it reads now is clearly incorrect if it is intended to apply to all situations (visible play clock or not).

So...since it has been clarified the document is only intended for use when there are visible play clocks, do you then agree it is correct?

I would be interested if you or any of your interpreters have observed any football related issues with the document so we can get it corrected.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2019, 09:11:54 PM by KWH »

Offline KWH

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2019, 05:02:48 PM »
I think that more to the point is the "lack of consistency" that the teams will be seeing.  Here in MA up until now we have always had a clear ready for play signal with an audible signal (whistle) that indicates the ball is ready for play and the 25 second play clock has started.  Everyone from multiple youth football levels thru HS varsity is well versed in the mechanics and timing.  With an idea that we will simply start a 40 second play clock on the DB signal from the end of the previous down I can see a learning curve for the coaches and players who have been doing it another way for decades that is more of an issue than us officials doing it.
You weren't the only state that has only been using just a 25 second clock. 49 others are in your exact same boat. It will be new to all of us. Some were against it but the overwhelming majority was for it.
I find it odd that you weren't using the 40 in MIAA since it has been in the NCAA Book for 10 plus years.

I know the coaches that were at our first MIAA sponsored overview of the NCAA vs. NFHS rules differences had serious heartburn over the play clock issues and the related mechanics.  We'll see how it works out.   :)
The NFHS had three states experiment with it for three years each and a 4th state that experimented with it for a year. Thats 10 seasons of football.
To the best of my knowledge, there were ZERO complaints from coaches! However, this stands to reason since the coaches were the driving force toward this change.
The coaches believe they will now control the pace of the game rather than the White Hat.  This is a true statement. The games will be more consistent. But, be careful what you ask for.
And yes indeed, We shall see how it works out.

Offline Magician

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2019, 08:40:44 PM »
You weren't the only state that has only been using just a 25 second clock. 49 others are in your exact same boat. It will be new to all of us. Some were against it but the overwhelming majority was for it.
I find it odd that you weren't using the 40 in MIAA since it has been in the NCAA Book for 10 plus years.
The NFHS had three states experiment with it for three years each and a 4th state that experimented with it for a year. Thats 10 seasons of football.
To the best of my knowledge, there were ZERO complaints from coaches! However, this stands to reason since the coaches were the driving force toward this change.
The coaches believe they will now control the pace of the game rather than the White Hat.  This is a true statement. The games will be more consistent. But, be careful what you ask for.
And yes indeed, We shall see how it works out.
The coaches weren't behind this at all and we were the first state to drive it. The actual impetus was our commissioner thought games were getting too long and the reason was referees who took too long to blow the RFP. He felt the 40-second clock would shorten the game. It doesn't have any real impact on the length. For every time you have a delay in starting the play clock with it stopped you also had delays while it was running. They wash out in the end. Blowout may be a little longer because you have less control over spreading out the plays at the end. But that has been minimal.

The coaches have no more control over the pace with a 40/25 as they do the 25. They can't do anything until the U backs away which will be about the same time the R would be blowing the RFP most of the times for a good crew. The difference is the amount of time left after that happens. Sometimes it will be 30 seconds and sometimes it will be 20 seconds. The consistency has to do with the end of the play clock not the beginning.

I'm sure your coaches are thinking they are going to be able to go really fast now! They'll want to snap the ball with 35 seconds left. The same thing happened when NCAA went to the 40 and our experiment started. They may have some plays where they can a couple seconds faster but that's about it. Most of the time they aren't ready until it's under 25 and often under 20.

Offline bossman72

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2019, 09:55:13 PM »
The coaches weren't behind this at all and we were the first state to drive it. The actual impetus was our commissioner thought games were getting too long and the reason was referees who took too long to blow the RFP. He felt the 40-second clock would shorten the game. It doesn't have any real impact on the length. For every time you have a delay in starting the play clock with it stopped you also had delays while it was running. They wash out in the end. Blowout may be a little longer because you have less control over spreading out the plays at the end. But that has been minimal.

The coaches have no more control over the pace with a 40/25 as they do the 25. They can't do anything until the U backs away which will be about the same time the R would be blowing the RFP most of the times for a good crew. The difference is the amount of time left after that happens. Sometimes it will be 30 seconds and sometimes it will be 20 seconds. The consistency has to do with the end of the play clock not the beginning.

I'm sure your coaches are thinking they are going to be able to go really fast now! They'll want to snap the ball with 35 seconds left. The same thing happened when NCAA went to the 40 and our experiment started. They may have some plays where they can a couple seconds faster but that's about it. Most of the time they aren't ready until it's under 25 and often under 20.

The only timing advantage for officials is that on first downs in bounds, you can crank it back up right away without putting the offense at a disadvantage by having the play clock start early.

Offline Magician

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Re: General Instructions for Football Game and Play Clock Operators - 2019
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2019, 10:04:55 PM »
The only timing advantage for officials is that on first downs in bounds, you can crank it back up right away without putting the offense at a disadvantage by having the play clock start early.

There are three other timing advantages for officials. First, the referee has to blow his whistle a lot fewer times during the game. Second, you will no longer be accused of cheating the defensive team by waiting to long to start the play clock at the end of a game when the offense is trying to consume time. Third, you won't be accused of blowing the ready for play too quickly and not give the offense enough time to get their play called and snapped before the play clock expired.

Offline AlUpstateNY

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There are three other timing advantages for officials. First, the referee has to blow his whistle a lot fewer times during the game. Second, you will no longer be accused of cheating the defensive team by waiting to long to start the play clock at the end of a game when the offense is trying to consume time. Third, you won't be accused of blowing the ready for play too quickly and not give the offense enough time to get their play called and snapped before the play clock expired.

Apparently, what's done is done, and in the long run may well prove to be "Much ado about NOTHING".  As for shortening overall game duration, this change ALONE does nothing to address any issues of inappropriately slow reactions by field crews (Only they can choose to correct those issues, themselves).  Crews that have already learned to effectively deal with problematically slow chain crews, distracted ball boys and other ancillary issues  will likely continue dealing with those issues to the best of their abilities (and frustrations).  The actual "pace" of the game will be set by the Officiating Crew, and will NOT INAPPROPRIATELY favor either team.  Teams will either respond to the pace being set and be prepared to play, or will have to deal with the consequences of not being fully prepared.

As for "accusations of cheating" or whining about any number of complaints, those same Crews, who have learned to effectively deal with "other ancillary issues" have likely gained experience in how/when to deal with "background static".  For those who have learned to listen to, hear and respond appropriately to the music, the "beat will go on".
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 09:55:33 AM by AlUpstateNY »

Offline NVFOA_Ump

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There are three other timing advantages for officials. First, the referee has to blow his whistle a lot fewer times during the game. Second, you will no longer be accused of cheating the defensive team by waiting to long to start the play clock at the end of a game when the offense is trying to consume time. Third, you won't be accused of blowing the ready for play too quickly and not give the offense enough time to get their play called and snapped before the play clock expired.

Except none of these really apply without a visible play clock.  When we're the only ones who really know when the play clock starts (actually a single official on the field keeping the play clock) then the debates, complaining, etc. will still be there.  As Al points out the "slow crews" are still going to be the "slow crews" regardless, 25 seconds or 40 seconds.  IMHO it will be far more difficult for the unwashed masses to figure out if we're being consistent with an audible RFP that also starts the play clock.  It's the visible play clock that puts all that to rest. 
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Online Ralph Damren

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There wasn't any suggestion by the experimental states that the 40" clock would shorten the overall length of the game. A couple of positive points ,beyond the consistent pace, was the reduction of DOG fouls and the number of "victory formation" plays needed at the end of the game. We Mainers didn't have a visible 25" play clock and now we don't have a visible 40" play clock. Are we happy  ::)? = NO; Will we make it work  yEs: ? =YES.

Offline Magician

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Except none of these really apply without a visible play clock.  When we're the only ones who really know when the play clock starts (actually a single official on the field keeping the play clock) then the debates, complaining, etc. will still be there.  As Al points out the "slow crews" are still going to be the "slow crews" regardless, 25 seconds or 40 seconds.  IMHO it will be far more difficult for the unwashed masses to figure out if we're being consistent with an audible RFP that also starts the play clock.  It's the visible play clock that puts all that to rest. 
Definitely true through the bulk of the game, but at the end of a game if a play ends with 52 seconds on the game clock and you don't start the RFP until there are 30 seconds left you'll hear it from the defense if they are trying to get the ball back with time remaining. Or if you blow it RFP with 45 seconds on the game clock you'll hear it from the offense. Either of those could definitely happen and probably do happen often. With the 40-second clock that issue goes away. It's just one of the benefits. With no visible play clocks you have a lot more flexibility outside of these situations to enforce the play clock. You'll still have that. But the time your watch is hitting zero will still be significantly more consistent than even the best crews using a 25 second clock.

Think of it like an auto pay from your bank. If you make your car payment manually every month and rely on memory to submit it some months you'll be early and some months you'll space it and be late. But if you automatically have the bank send it on the 5th of every month it's one less thing you have to worry about. That's essentially the benefit here.