Author Topic: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule  (Read 5205 times)

Offline MJT

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10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« on: December 31, 2010, 05:58:29 PM »
This was discussed in the chat room today, and I was asked about the exact rule since I have a NFL rule book. Here it is from the book. I wouldn't be surprised if we see something similar next year in the NCAA.

"Action to conserve time" - A team is not permitted to conserve time inside of one minute of either half by committing any of the following acts: fouls by either  team that prevent the ball from being snapped (i.e. FST, ENC, ING, IFP from beyond the LOS to conserve time, BBPass OOBs to conserve time, and ANY other intentional foul that causes the clock to stop.   
PENALTY: Loss of 5 yards unless a larger distance penalty is applicable. When committed by the offensive team with the clock running, officials will run 10 seconds of the game clock before permitting the ball to be put into play on the RFP signal. The clock will start on the RFP. If the offense has TOs remaining it will have the option of using the TO in lieu of the 10-second runoff. If the action is by the defense, the play clock will be reset to 40 seconds and the game clock will start on the RFP signal. If the defense has TOs remaining, it will have the option of using the TO in lieu of the game clock being started.   NOTE: There can never be a 10 second runoff against the defense.

Offline cougar729

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2011, 05:21:48 PM »
Just my opinion, but how often does this really happen?  Is it really necessary to insert this into the NCAA game?

Offline Rulesman

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2011, 05:27:58 PM »
Just my opinion, but how often does this really happen?
Probably more than you might think.
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Offline Diablo

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2011, 08:29:58 AM »
Just my opinion, but how often does this really happen?  Is it really necessary to insert this into the NCAA game?

I don't think the frequency of this sort of situation is important. 
Team A fouls and gains an advantage - stopping the clock so that they can kick a field goal.  That unfair(?) score in the last second of a game is the issue.  It has mega impact on who wins.   

Offline MJT

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2011, 12:02:32 PM »
Just my opinion, but how often does this really happen?  Is it really necessary to insert this into the NCAA game?

As Diablo said, you don't do this for the frequency, but for the importance of when it does happen. I think it will be a rule in NCAA next year. Parry said it will be discussed after this years incident.

Offline JasonTX

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2011, 03:24:59 PM »
I think they should just repeal the bulletin play that changed how we would have normally applied rule 3-4-3. 

Offline RMR

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2011, 04:33:35 PM »
Based on the way that rule is written, would that have even applied to the situation the other night?
"Just because you don't understand it, doesn't mean it's wrong."

Offline Andrew McCarthy

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2011, 04:37:57 PM »
I think they should just repeal the bulletin play that changed how we would have normally applied rule 3-4-3. 
But even winding the clock after penalty enforcement in many situations with a couple seconds left will still give Team A ample time to trot out the kicking team and be set to snap the ball on the RFP.

Offline JasonTX

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2011, 05:35:09 PM »
Based on the way that rule is written, would that have even applied to the situation the other night?

It left the decision with the R to determine if they fouled in order to gain an advantage.  The bulletin says to start it on the snap since the pass is legal.  Previously most R's would have started the clock on the ready.

Offline MJT

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2011, 06:10:19 PM »
Based on the way that rule is written, would that have even applied to the situation the other night?

Current 3-4-3 wouldn't have made a difference the other nt, but the current NFL rule would. I'd be surprised if some type of rule similar to to the NFL rule is not in place next year for us.

Offline TXMike

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2011, 08:47:17 PM »
When we have discussed this in the past I don't recall anyone suggesting something as draconian as the NFL solution (which I am still not clear on as to whether or could have even helped here as this was a live ball foul). 

I suspect there will be many options offered and studied.  One I would add to the list:  If Team A is judged to have deliberately fouled to conserve playing time, they will be assessed a 15 yard penalty, clock will start on the RFP, and they will be prohibited from subbing out any players who were in the game (except for injured players).

Offline MJT

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2011, 11:36:32 PM »
TXMike,
It will be interesting to see what happens, but the NFL rule would have helped in that situation, as the foul occurred when the clock was running and was by the offense. There would have been a 10 second runoff since the offense did not have any TO's left, and thus the game would have ended.

Offline Rulesman

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2011, 09:58:53 AM »
TXMike,
It will be interesting to see what happens, but the NFL rule would have helped in that situation, as the foul occurred when the clock was running and was by the offense. There would have been a 10 second runoff since the offense did not have any TO's left, and thus the game would have ended.
... AND we wouldn't be having this discussion.  ;)
"Gentlemen, we are going to relentlessly chase perfection, knowing full well we will not catch it, because nothing is perfect. But we are going to relentlessly chase it, because in the process we will catch excellence. I am not remotely interested in just being good."
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Offline RickKY

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2011, 07:48:23 AM »
The foul occured before the clock ran out, and thus not on the last timed down of the half or game.  Therfore, team A did not ebnefit from the foul.  In fact, they were harmed by the 5 yard penalty.  I see no issue with this play or subsequent enforcement, other than it looked bad.
Rick
Don't park in the spaces marked, "Reserved for Umpires."  ~John McSherry

Offline TXMike

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2011, 07:59:40 AM »
They benefited by fouling as if they had waitewd until all the extra "subs" and "players" left the field, clock would have run out.  By deliberately snapping, even though they would get a penalty. The QB was able to stop the clock. Parry has said this wilkl likely be tweaked before next season

Offline Welpe

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2011, 08:37:11 AM »
They benefited by fouling as if they had waitewd until all the extra "subs" and "players" left the field, clock would have run out.  By deliberately snapping, even though they would get a penalty. The QB was able to stop the clock. Parry has said this wilkl likely be tweaked before next season

This is wild speculation at this point but do you think we'll see it filter down to HS?

Offline TXMike

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2011, 10:11:31 AM »
I see no reason for a UIL exception if NCAA makes a rule change.

Offline Welpe

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Re: 10 second run-off -- the NFL rule
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2011, 10:38:20 AM »
Maybe they can slip the 40 second clock in there too...  ;D