Author Topic: Penn State  (Read 20892 times)

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2011, 08:23:33 PM »

Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2011, 09:01:33 AM »
Did you "see" the sun come up this AM?  If you did not will you deny that it DID come up? APPARENTLY the fan's catcalls ARE correct...you ARE blind.    ;)

I don't know about blind, but obviously I lack the x-ray vision that allows you to see, so clearly and completely, inside someone else's deepest thoughts.  As one of the many who has made really poor decisions, at one time or another, I understand that sometimes really decent and honest people don't make their best decisions, and often pay serious consequences for lapses in judgment. Unlike you, I have a long way to go before reaching the level of perfection, you apparently have decided you enjoy, so I just have to muddle along trying to do the best I can.

I guess I shouldn't expect folks like you TxMike, who obviously has never made any kind of mistaken or inaccurate judgment, to understand that many of us are actually a lot further from perfect, than you consider yourself to be, and understand how sometimes what we think is the right thing to do, turns out not to be, especially when years of hindsight are added to the mix. 

No, I didn't see the "smoking gun" you are alluding to in the Grand Jury report, I was hoping someone, such as yourself, with apparently a much finer perceptive capability could point it out for me.  Perhaps my hearing is also deficient, as I don't usually hear fans catcalls, or maybe I've just learned to ignore really stupid comments like they don't exist, such as bringing Mr. Sandusky's pension into the conversation.I didn't realize a concern over Mr. Sandusky's pension was a relative part of a discussion about Coach Paterno's actions.

HLinNC, you are correct, "The chain of command does not absolve you from reporting a crime", when you have personally observed a crime, or are absolutely certain of all the circumstances.  When either, or both, are absent reporting the activity to the appropriate level up the chain, for further investigation and verification, seems prudent and reasonable. Given the subject matter, I can understand Mr. Paterno's disdain for pursuing the matter, a decision he has publicly acknowledged regret for. 

From what I've read, the allegation presented to Coach Paterno, the expressed detail of which remains subject to question, was an allegation of a serious enough accusation that called for verification and clarification and was referred to the investigative authority for handling. 

All this speculation  about "years of prior suspicions", ongoing cover-up, coulda-shoulda known what was going on, excessive concern over the Institution's reputation and assorted other totally unsubstantiated theories are just so much fantasy that reveal more about the insitgator's frame of mind than Coach Paterno.

If there's smoke, there will ultimately be fire, but until there's fire there isn't any real heat.  I'm comfortable waiting to see if there is actually any fire.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2011, 09:03:45 AM by AlUpstateNY »

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2011, 09:20:40 AM »
I guess I shouldn't expect folks like you TxMike, who obviously has never made any kind of mistaken or inaccurate judgment, to understand that many of us are actually a lot further from perfect, than you consider yourself to be, and understand how sometimes what we think is the right thing to do, turns out not to be, especially when years of hindsight are added to the mix. 
This is not about making a "simple" mistake.  This is about a serious breach of law and about facilitating the continuing sexual abuse of children.  I guarandamntee you i have NEVER done that .

From what I've read, the allegation presented to Coach Paterno, the expressed detail of which remains subject to question, was an allegation of a serious enough accusation that called for verification and clarification and was referred to the investigative authority for handling. 
 

What "investigative authority" was it referred to? ?  That is the problem, it was NOT properly referred.

[/quote]

If there's smoke, there will ultimately be fire, but until there's fire there isn't any real heat.  I'm comfortable waiting to see if there is actually any fire.

That is probably just what Paterno said to himself also.  How did that work for him?

There is plenty of fire and lots  more in the future for some of those in this travesty:


Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #28 on: November 14, 2011, 02:52:30 PM »
This is not about making a "simple" mistake.  This is about a serious breach of law and about facilitating the continuing sexual abuse of children.  I guarandamntee you i have NEVER done that . 

What "investigative authority" was it referred to? ?  That is the problem, it was NOT properly referred.


That is probably just what Paterno said to himself also.  How did that work for him?


TxMike, this is not about you, except for the fact that you seem incredibly eager and anxious to totally trash a man who has otherwise seemed to have lived a very positive life, on the basis of speculation, suposition, innuend and rumor.  As it has been reported that PA Child Protective Agencies have records about complaints relating to Mr. Sandusky at the 2nd Mile charity dating back to the late 1990s, it's a real stretch to lay any blame for "the continuing sexual abuse of children." at Coach Paterno's feet.

As to the investigative authority Paterno reported the incident to, the DA has been quoted as suggesting it was an appropriate referral.  Sorry, but I'll go with what he is suggesting.

It seems a lot of your argument is built on what you have chosen to presume was "probably" said or done by a lot of people involved.  I agree that, "There is plenty of fire and lots  more in the future for some of those in this travesty" and am thankful you will have absolutely nothing to say about how, or to whom, that fire is applied.

Offline Kalle

  • *
  • Posts: 2659
  • FAN REACTION: +96/-30
Re: Penn State
« Reply #29 on: November 14, 2011, 03:24:41 PM »
TXMike, could you clarify one thing to me. The grand jury report says (on page 12) that it is the responsibility of the person in charge of the school to report a suspected child abuse to the Department of Public Welfare. Is the head coach of a football team considered a "person in charge of the school"? I would think not, but I'm not well versed in the US legal system.

If not, then hasn't Paterno done exactly what he should have, ie. reported the suspicions passed to him up the chain of command? Granted, he probably should have verified that a report is made, but, as he was not legally bound to report it, would he have risked himself to a defamation suit, if the allegations presented to him would have been false? Shouldn't the graduate assistant have contacted the police, as he was the one who witnessed the crime?

Note that I'm not saying that Paterno is innocent, but based on the grand jury report alone, I don't really see what crime he has committed. He may have made a moral mistake (by not making sure either the AD or the GA reports to the authorities), but I'm not sure if he should be hanged just because of that.

Offline TxSkyBolt

  • *
  • Posts: 1845
  • FAN REACTION: +35/-45
Penn State
« Reply #30 on: November 14, 2011, 03:25:42 PM »
TxMike can't help it. Them Ex G-Men think everyone is guilty. :)


---
I am here: http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=32.870335,-117.210441

mbyron

  • Guest
Re: Penn State
« Reply #31 on: November 14, 2011, 03:31:09 PM »
TXMike, could you clarify one thing to me. The grand jury report says (on page 12) that it is the responsibility of the person in charge of the school to report a suspected child abuse to the Department of Public Welfare. Is the head coach of a football team considered a "person in charge of the school"? I would think not, but I'm not well versed in the US legal system.

If not, then hasn't Paterno done exactly what he should have, ie. reported the suspicions passed to him up the chain of command?
As I understand it, this is correct regarding Paterno's legal obligations, and it's the reason he has not (yet) been charged with a crime. I gather that he's hired a criminal defense attorney to keep it that way, and to be able to give all the right answers from here on out.

Another example of why a person can properly be fired for ethical violations who has committed no crimes.

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #32 on: November 14, 2011, 04:06:41 PM »
It seems a lot of your argument is built on what you have chosen to presume was "probably" said or done by a lot of people involved.  I agree that, "There is plenty of fire and lots  more in the future for some of those in this travesty" and am thankful you will have absolutely nothing to say about how, or to whom, that fire is applied.

I am sure Sandusky and anyone else who is facing Lady Justice is praying for others like you and the OJ jury and the Casey Anthony jury to be there to bail their sorry butts out. 

Offline Kalle

  • *
  • Posts: 2659
  • FAN REACTION: +96/-30
Re: Penn State
« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2011, 11:53:34 PM »
Another example of why a person can properly be fired for ethical violations who has committed no crimes.

Exactly. Penn State can (and should) require a higher standard from their employees than the law does.

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #34 on: November 16, 2011, 05:15:43 AM »
Great news Al !

From the AP:


By Associated Press, Published: November 15 | Updated: Wednesday, November 16, 1:05 AM
HARRISBURG, Pa. — Former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno’s long service at the university theoretically puts him in line for a pension of more than $500,000 a year, according to an Associated Press analysis of state public pension records.

Paterno’s pension records obtained Tuesday from the State Employees’ Retirement System credit him with more than 60 years in the system. The formula used to determine benefits makes him eligible for a pension equal to 100 percent of the average of his three highest-salary years.


His pay rose from $541,000 to $568,000 over the past three full calendar years.

When Paterno retires, he will have to make a set of choices to determine his pension, including whether to designate a survivor to receive benefits after he dies and whether to obtain a one-time, lump-sum payment of his own contributions.

State Employees’ Retirement System spokeswoman Pamela Hile said Internal Revenue Code and Retirement Code benefit limits may also apply, so the agency does not issue estimated pension benefits ahead of time. There also is a long-service supplement that could boost Paterno to 110 percent of his final average salary.

A 2006 report on Pennsylvania state pensions said the largest pension at that time within SERS was $254,000, being collected by a Penn State surgery professor who had withdrawn a $554,000 lump sum.

The New York Times also reported Tuesday night that Paterno transferred full ownership of his house to his wife, Sue, for $1 in July. The couple had previously held joint ownership of the house. Paterno’s attorney Wick Sollers told the paper in an e-mail that the transfer had nothing to do with the scandal but was part of an ongoing “multiyear estate planning program.”

Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #35 on: November 16, 2011, 12:28:39 PM »
Great news Al !

The New York Times also reported Tuesday night that Paterno transferred full ownership of his house to his wife, Sue, for $1 in July. The couple had previously held joint ownership of the house. Paterno’s attorney Wick Sollers told the paper in an e-mail that the transfer had nothing to do with the scandal but was part of an ongoing “multiyear estate planning program.” 

I'm truly embarrassed for you, TXMike, rather than simply admit you've allowed your emotions to push you way out in front of this story, you are clearly trying to use the age old, and discredited practice, of trying to thow so much crap up against the wall you're hoping that something will stick. I see no requirement to rush to judgment before all the facts are known, and believe Coach Paterno's personal record over a long and positive career have earned him the benefit of doubt concerning charges against him that are, thus far, purely speculative and primarily based on supposition, presumption, rumor and in some situations pure fantasy.

I'll reserve the right to ammend my conclusions as additional FACTS may warrant.
 

I don't know, nor do I much care, about the retirement package Coach Paterno, or the accused criminal in this situation may have earned or qualified for.  That is a matter far beyond my reach or control and I certainly don't see what relevance it has to whatever point you are trying to make, with your exaggerated judgmental posturing and rather hollow attempt to characterize yourself as some champion of justice and all that is good and proper.

I don't think anybody, anywhere is comfortable or pleased with any part of this scandal, and your juvenile inferences to that end merely make you look like a self centered, "holier than thou" pompous jerk. 

I accept your right to form whatever opinion YOU may arrive at on your own, regardless of how much I may disagree with your conclusions. it seems reasonable that you might extend the same level of curtesy to opinions that differ from yours, without wasting a lot of time on snarky nonsense.  For the record, I don't place a lot of confidence on unfounded suggestions the NY Times makes either. 
« Last Edit: November 16, 2011, 12:31:32 PM by AlUpstateNY »

Offline busman

  • *
  • Posts: 1261
  • FAN REACTION: +49/-63
Re: Penn State
« Reply #36 on: November 16, 2011, 03:22:27 PM »
The grad assistant is saying he did a little more than what was reported - he did stop the rape as it was happening and called the police AND reported it to Paterno.

I've always felt like he has been scapegoated in the press too much. 

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #37 on: November 22, 2011, 05:27:21 AM »
And yet no police agency has a record of his complaint?  And just how did this "hero" grad assisitant let the world know he is not the scumbag he is being portrayed as?  In an email to someone who he says in the email "he barely knows" and yet he is making this revelation to him???  I call HORSE HOCKEY on that.  I have no doubt Sandusky stopped the assault (maybe just momentarily) if he saw the GA as the GA claimed but did the GA grab the kid and remove him from the situation?   NO!

Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #38 on: November 22, 2011, 09:43:11 AM »
Did you "see" the sun come up this AM?  If you did not will you deny that it DID come up?

APPARENTLY the fan's catcalls ARE correct...you ARE blind.    ;)

I learned long ago, TXMike, to ignore fans catcalls.  I don't think it's as much a question of being blind as it is accepting the fact I don't have X-ray vision and can presume I see into other people' thoughts.

If it makes you feel more secure, throwing someone else under the nearest bus, the problem might just be with your sense of personal security. 

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #39 on: November 22, 2011, 09:46:36 AM »
Don't take x-ray vision superman, just some plain old-fashioned common sense.  Let me know when you find some.

Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #40 on: November 22, 2011, 04:28:34 PM »
Don't take x-ray vision superman, just some plain old-fashioned common sense.  Let me know when you find some.

I'm not exactly sure what you might call having 02% of the facts and adding an additional 98% based on imagination, rumor, speculation and an inflated sense of self to form an iron clad conclusion, but it doesn't sound like "plain old fashioned common sense".

For what it's worth TXMike, pointing out how bad you think Joe Paterno, or anyone else, might be doesn't make you look any better.

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #41 on: November 22, 2011, 05:27:14 PM »
I am not in this to "make myself look better".    Ignoring what is staring you in the face does not make you look better either...although it may qualify you to work in the PSU Athletic Department

Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #42 on: November 23, 2011, 02:25:51 PM »
I am not in this to "make myself look better".    Ignoring what is staring you in the face does not make you look better either...although it may qualify you to work in the PSU Athletic Department 

Sorry TxMike, but it seems a lot of what you post is designed to try and make you look better or sound smarter.

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #43 on: November 23, 2011, 02:57:34 PM »
Why you wanna make this about me???   This is about a group of pathetic POS' who allowed a sadistic SON OF A GUN to roam unfettered for who knows how long?

Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #44 on: November 25, 2011, 11:36:48 AM »
Why you wanna make this about me???   This is about a group of pathetic POS' who allowed a sadistic SON OF A GUN to roam unfettered for who knows how long?

TXMike you always want it to be about YOU, and about how ONLY YOU see whatever the issue is that much clearer than anyone else.  YOU don't KNOW squat about who may, or may not, did, or did not, do something, or anything to allow, cover up, encourage or ignore what actually happened.  As you are historically prone to do, you smelled red meat, jumped to the worst possible conclusions and off the nearest cliff.

I'm not arguing that some people may, or may not, have made poor judgments because, like you, I don't KNOW what these individuals knew, suspected, imagined or thought might be going on.  If you choose to BUTT/u/me the absolute worst possibilities about decisions some, who have otherwise handled themselves pretty well, at least under a very public, very intrusive public microscope for a very long time, based on nothing more than conjecture, suspicion, rumor and the fantasies YOUR OWN MIND conjure up, that's YOUR choice, but that choice is ON YOU.

Having made a busload of poor decisions, I'm somewhat more open to the simple fact good people sometimes make dumb decisions without having any actual evil, hidden or complicated secret agenda.  Sometimes what actually may seem, at a given moment, like the right thing to do, regretably turns out not to be, especially when fueled by a lot of pure hind sight.

If YOU don't want this issue to, "be about you", stop being the one insisting on throwing all the rocks and wait like everyone else to ACTUALLY SEE where the facts take this matter.

Offline TxSkyBolt

  • *
  • Posts: 1845
  • FAN REACTION: +35/-45
Re: Penn State
« Reply #45 on: November 25, 2011, 12:59:32 PM »
Yawn.......Can you guys get your own chat room?  deadhorse:

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #46 on: December 03, 2011, 07:00:55 AM »
You want "facts" Al??? How bout these from the perv himself?  He has opened his mouth again and said Paterno said NOTHING to him about the kids.

Center of Penn State Scandal, Sandusky Tells His Own Story
 
By JO BECKER
 

The former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, in his first extended interview since his indictment on sexual abuse charges last month, said Coach Joe Paterno never spoke to him about any suspected misconduct with minors. Mr. Sandusky also said the charity he worked for never restricted his access to children until he became the subject of a criminal investigation in 2008.

The failure by Mr. Paterno to act more aggressively after being told in 2002 that Mr. Sandusky had molested a 10-year-old boy in the showers of the university’s football building played a role in Mr. Paterno’s firing last month after 62 years at Penn State. Mr. Sandusky, in the interview, said that Mr. Paterno did not speak to him or confront him over the accusation, despite the fact that Mr. Sandusky had been one of his assistant coaches for three decades and was a regular presence at the football team’s complex for years after the 2002 episode.

Mr. Sandusky, in a nearly four-hour interview over two days this week, insisted he had never sexually abused any child, but he confirmed details of some of the events that prosecutors have cited in charging him with 40 counts of molesting young boys, all of whom came to know Mr. Sandusky through the charity he founded, known as the Second Mile.

Mr. Sandusky said he regularly gave money to the disadvantaged boys at his charity, opened bank accounts for them, and gave them gifts that had been donated to the charity.

Prosecutors have said Mr. Sandusky used such gifts as a way to build a sense of trust and loyalty among boys he then repeatedly abused.

Mr. Sandusky, after repeated requests, agreed to the interview because he said his decades of work with children had been misunderstood and distorted by prosecutors.

“They’ve taken everything that I ever did for any young person and twisted it to say that my motives were sexual or whatever,” Mr. Sandusky said. He added: “I had kid after kid after kid who might say I was a father figure. And they just twisted that all.”

Yet over the course of the interview, Mr. Sandusky described what he admitted was a family and work life that could often be chaotic, even odd, one that lacked some classic boundaries between adults and children, and thus one that was open to interpretation — by those who have defended him as a generous mentor and those who have condemned him as a serial predator.

He said his household in State College, Pa., over the years came to be a kind of recreation center or second home for dozens of children from the charity, a place where games were played, wrestling matches staged, sleepovers arranged, and from where trips to out-of-town sporting events were launched. Asked directly why he appeared to interact with children who were not his own without many of the typical safeguards other adults might apply — showering with them, sleeping alone with them in hotel rooms, blowing on their stomachs — he essentially said that he saw those children as his own.

“It was, you know, almost an extended family,” Mr. Sandusky said of his household’s relationship with children from the charity. He then characterized his close experiences with children he took under his wing as “precious times,” and said that the physical aspect of the relationships “just happened that way.”

Wrestling, hugging — “I think a lot of the kids really reached out for that,” he said.

Mr. Sandusky said his wife, Dorothy, known as Dottie, ultimately had some concerns about the household dynamics. He said she had warned him not to neglect his own children — the Sanduskys had adopted six children, including one from the Second Mile — “for the sake of other kids.” Mr. Sandusky recalled one scene after a Penn State football game that underscored her concerns.

“I remember the kids were downstairs, and we always had dogs,” he said. “And Dottie said, ‘You better go down and check on those kids, you know those Second Mile kids after football games.’ I went down, and I look, and there goes a kid flying over a couch, there goes a dog flying over a couch. And I go, ‘I don’t think she wants to see this.’ ”

He said of his household: “Yeah, I mean it was turmoil. It was turmoil.”

During the interview, conducted at the home of his lawyer, Mr. Sandusky was at times subdued, but occasionally capable of humor — some of it awkward laughter about his legal jeopardy and ruined reputation, some of it bright amusement at a recalled anecdote about his own father, who himself had worked with disadvantaged and disabled children, or a moment of remembered comedy at one of the many summer camps he helped run for children.

He grew most animated when talking about his relationships with children, and he grew most disconsolate when he, with a touch of childlike reverence, spoke of Mr. Paterno and Penn State, and the damage his indictment had caused them. “I don’t think it was fair,” he said.

During the interview, Joseph Amendola, Mr. Sandusky’s lawyer, captured what he asserted was his client’s predicament:

“All those good things that you were doing have been turned around,” Mr. Amendola said, speaking to his client, “and the people who are painting you as a monster are saying, ‘Well, they’re the types of things that people who are pedophiles exhibit.’ ”

Prosecutors, in their indictment of Mr. Sandusky, charged him with a horrific array of abuse, including the repeated assaults of young boys.

Mr. Sandusky, in the interview, confirmed aspects of what prosecutors have said was a manipulative scheme: he gave money and gifts to Second Mile children, including computers and golf clubs. However, Mr. Sandusky presented his actions in a benevolent light.

“I would call kids on the phone and work with them academically,” he said. “I tried to reward them sometimes with a little money in hand, just so that they could see something. But more often than not, I tried to set up, maybe get them to save the money, and I put it directly into a savings account established for them.”

Sometimes, he said, he found work for the children at his football camps. Sometimes he bought them shoes or a shirt with his money. And sometimes, he passed along gifts to them that had been given to the charity by donors. “I never bought a computer for any kid; I had a computer given to me to give to a kid,” he said. “I never bought golf clubs. People gave things because they knew there would be kids. They wanted to get rid of things.”

It is unclear whether the supervisors or directors of the charity knew of Mr. Sandusky’s setting up bank accounts or giving away donated gifts. Investigators with the Pennsylvania attorney general’s office have subpoenaed the financial records of the charity, but say they have been alarmed to learn that some records from some years are missing.

Jack Raykovitz, the executive director of Second Mile, resigned after Mr. Sandusky’s indictment.

Mr. Sandusky, in the interview, said Penn State officials had contacted Mr. Raykovitz after the episode in 2002. An assistant football coach has told investigators that he saw Mr. Sandusky raping a young boy in the football building’s showers, and that he told Mr. Paterno some version of that scene the following day. Mr. Paterno has testified that he then informed the university’s athletic director, Tim Curley, that Mr. Sandusky had done something sexually inappropriate with a young boy.

Mr. Sandusky, in the interview, said word of an episode with a young boy in the shower reached Mr. Raykovitz. He said he talked with Mr. Raykovitz, and identified the boy he thought Penn State was concerned about. Mr. Sandusky, though, said Mr. Raykovitz did not see fit to limit his interaction with youths, in part because he was aware of the nature of Mr. Sandusky’s mentoring relationship with the boy, and in part because he knew Mr. Sandusky had undergone repeated background checks clearing him to work with children.

Mr. Raykovitz’s lawyer, Kevin L. Hand, called Mr. Sandusky’s account inaccurate, but refused to say more.

As for Mr. Paterno, Mr. Sandusky said the two never spoke about any incidents, not the episode in 2002 or an earlier complaint of child molestation made against Mr. Sandusky in 1998 that was investigated by the Penn State campus police.

“I never talked to him about either one,” Mr. Sandusky said of Mr. Paterno. “That’s all I can say. I mean, I don’t know.”

Mr. Paterno, through his son, Scott, has denied knowing about the 1998 investigation at the time it happened.

“He’s the only one who knows whether anybody ever said anything to him,” Mr. Sandusky said of Mr. Paterno.

In the interview, Mr. Sandusky, the longtime defensive coordinator at Penn State, said that his relationships and activities with Second Mile children did cause some strain with Mr. Paterno, but only in that Mr. Sandusky worried that having some of the children with him at hotels before games, or on the sideline during games, risked being seen as a distraction by the demanding Mr. Paterno.

“I would have dreams of we being in a squad meeting and that door fly open and kids come running through chasing one another, and what was I going to do?” he said. “Because, I mean, Joe was serious about football.”

Mr. Sandusky, despite expressing concern about talking about the formal charges made against him, did talk about his relationships with several of the eight people cited as victims by prosecutors last month. He said his relationships with more than one of them had extended for years after the suspected episodes of molestation or inappropriate behavior.

In 1998, the mother of a child reported concerns to the Penn State campus police when she learned her son had showered with Mr. Sandusky at the university. After an investigation, Mr. Sandusky admitted to the police and child welfare authorities that he had most likely done something inappropriate, according to prosecutors. The local district attorney declined to prosecute.

In the interview this week, Mr. Sandusky said the boy and his mother remained a part of his life for years. He said that the mother had sought him out for tickets to Penn State games for her son, and that Mr. Sandusky had contributed financially years later, when the young man, interested in the ministry, went on a mission.

“He went to Mexico in the poverty-stricken areas and worked with the kids and things like that,” Mr. Sandusky said of the young man. “He showed me, he sent me pictures of he and the kids.”

In the grand jury report, prosecutors cited Mr. Sandusky’s attempts to reach some of his accusers. He acknowledged that he reached out to at least one, but said he thought the young man might be a character witness on his behalf, and was unaware that prosecutors had listed him as a victim.

Asked how he came to be involved more closely with some children rather than others, Mr. Sandusky said he got to know many of them at Second Mile summer camps.

“Some of them sought me out,” Mr. Sandusky said.

Mr. Sandusky, facing grave charges and the possibility of imprisonment, discussed how much was now missing from his life, and how much more might be missing in the future.

“I miss coaching,” he said. “I miss Second Mile. I miss Second Mile kids. I miss interrelationships with all kinds of people. I miss my own grandkids. I miss, I mean you know I’m going to miss my dog. So, I mean, yeah, I miss, yeah. Good grief.

“I used to have a lot of contact with a lot of people and so that circle is diminished, and as it diminished, you know Bo is still there,” he said of his dog. “And I swear he understands. I swear he knows. And you know I love him dearly for that.”

Offline TxSkyBolt

  • *
  • Posts: 1845
  • FAN REACTION: +35/-45
Re: Penn State
« Reply #47 on: December 03, 2011, 08:12:23 AM »
Sounds like a Michael Jackson.

Offline AlUpstateNY

  • *
  • Posts: 3271
  • FAN REACTION: +252/-472
Re: Penn State
« Reply #48 on: December 04, 2011, 01:23:22 PM »
You want "facts" Al??? How bout these from the perv himself?  He has opened his mouth again and said Paterno said NOTHING to him about the kids.

TxMike, I'm not even close to being competent to explain your obsession about Joe Paterno's supposed responsibility for Mr. Sandusky's behaviors, but the lengthy account you've provided seems to directly contradict your PRESUMPTION that Paterno was aware of what was alledgedly going on.

Your article seems to corroborate that Mr. Paterno and Mr. Sandusky didn't talk much about ANYTHING following his retirement, which apparently followed Paterno's decision that Mr. Sandusky would not be his choice for a replacement. I wonder if these men were even on speaking terms following Sandusky's retirement.

It would seem that you are absolutely, HECK bent on connecting a lot of dots, many of which, exist only in your imagination, to shore up your rigid preconclusion, that has yet to be borne out by any confirming evidence.  If that somehow makes you feel better about yourself, knock yourself out.

All this stuff about, "being proven guilty of something, before convicting"  still seems to make sense to me, so I'll be satisfied waiting forr the "rest of the story" before clamoring to throw the switch, of course, if that's alright with you.
   

Offline TXMike

  • *
  • Posts: 8406
  • FAN REACTION: +223/-239
  • When you quit learning you quit living
Re: Penn State
« Reply #49 on: December 17, 2011, 06:38:55 AM »
http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/blog/dr_saturday/post/Joe-Paterno-told-a-grand-jury-he-8216-knew-ina?urn=ncaaf-wp11597

Paterno did not inform police and waited several days to meet with his boss, athletic director Tim Curley, because he "didn't want to interfere with their weekends

McQueary said he thought Curley and Schultz took his report seriously, and that he considered Schultz law enforcement because his position included oversight of campus police. "I thought I was talking to the head of the police, to be frank with you," McQueary said. "In my mind it was like speaking to a (district attorney). It was someone who police reported to and would know what to do with it."
« Last Edit: December 17, 2011, 08:46:01 AM by Grant - AR »