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Kalle, a rarely as we disagree, I have to also disagree with using colors, for the exact, and well stated, reasons offered by Punter.  I believe it is much better to use Offense/Defense, Kicking Team/Receiving Team, Passing Team/Return Team, Fumbling Team/Return Team.  On routine scrimmage plays with no change of team possession, this is rarely a problem.  But, when there is a change of team possession during the down, and on kicking downs, we need to know those true descriptions, because penalty enforcement for each foul is dependent upon the team that committed it.
I had a situation recently in which an return (intercepting) team had three live-ball fouls during the same down - one prior to the interception, and two afterward.  One guy on my crew failed to use the proper description, and it seemed like we had fouls by both teams, so I was trying to figure out if "clean hands" applied.  After a few moments of trying to figure things out, the one guy re-reported that his foul was by [team name].  With that, I realized all three fouls were by the return (intercepting) team, so there was only the decision about which of those to accept, which turned out to be offside, to give the ball back to the passing team, penalize, and repeat the down.  The penalties for the other fouls would have required allowing the return (intercepting) team to keep the ball, which were obviously not going to be accepted.
It would have helped immensely if he had initially reported that his foul was by the return team, during the return.

The CCA manuals permit the use of a jersey color (or offense/defense, etc.) when reporting a foul.  But I highly recommend avoiding the use of a jersey color.

As much as anything, though, don't report and run away.  Stay nearby, in case the R needs more info from you.

Robert
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 The rules say canít change it  That being said I recall at least 2 times plays where a change was made after the next play and the soup and RR seemed to be okay with it
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I would consider this to be one of the more egregious errors I have ever seen (at least in the top three).  Not a knock on the R, I have pointed the wrong way and even marked off the wrong direction but we have always caught it.   I might have stopped the game after the first play and corrected the error (assuming he really did know it after just one play).   

Question:  Since the R has full authority to do the RIGHT thing shouldn't he have been able to cancel the next play and correct the error?   I think I would rather be written up for that than costing a team 57 yards to start a new series.
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If the teams are not in sight when the clock hits 3:00, then the wing officials go get their respective teams.  We have never (in a crew I've been on) flagged a team for coming out late for the 2nd half.

Go get them? Oh, no, that's not happening, mostly because I wouldn't know where they are or how many locked doors are between us.

I've been part of two games where a team was flagged (same team, unsurprisingly) only because they failed to show up at any time during the 3 minutes and only trotted back on field barely in time for the second half kickoff.

The halftime length is always part of the pregame discussion that the R+U have with the head coaches and the length of that time is based on their agreement.  That's worked OK all year and based on our guidance from the MIAA is fine with the caveat that we must have a full 3 minutes at the end of the intermission with both teams present on the field.

If everybody is in agreement, I'm not going to be a stick in the mud and flag it up the chain of command or anything -- just saying that *by rule* that may not be a long enough halftime. I've heard tell of JV games in bad weather that have running clocks in the first quarter (by coach agreement, not automatic) where halftime was only 5 minutes... again not rule based, but everybody agreed and nobody is going to complain.
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Also, by rule, halftime cannot be shorter than 10 minutes which *does not* include the 3 minute warm up period. If you have a 10 minute halftime where the 3 minute warm up is the final 3 of those ten, then your halftime is only 7 minutes long -- in violation of 3-1-1.

Agreed, but for whatever reason a lot of associations seem to allow fudging it during halftime. Some include the 3 in the time, others ignore if the 3 never gets put up, and plenty allow more than 20 minutes (mostly for homecoming) even though the rule and case book are very clear that they're not allowed to do that.
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I disagree.  As an R I only want to hear offense, defense, kickers and receivers.  Nothing is worse than jersey color.  I orient myself on the field based on offense, defense, receivers and kickers.  At the beginning of the play, I know I am with the receivers so when someone tells me receivers, I know which way to point.  I get discombobulated on the field when someone gives me a color especially at the end of the kick play when all the players are moving around.  The last thing I want to think of before an announcement is which color was the receivers or kickers.

This particular issue does happen, especially when it is a foul that the receivers normally commit.  This is not unusual at all to get confused on kick plays.  I train myself as part of my pre-kick routine to say to myself, I am with the receivers, or on a punt, I am with the kickers (then I try to remember which team they are as well). 

This is actually a hard thing on kicks that non-Rs do not get.  This year, I had an official on a kick (punt) report a color to me instead of saying kickers and receivers, and to complicate matters there were two fouls on the play.  I ended up pointing the wrong way which created havoc that we did not need.  I know that I should remember who kicked and received, but when you are processing 2 fouls, 2 numbers, which penalty is more advantageous, and all that stuff it's hard.  Sometimes, it is even harder when it is your own foul to remember everything especially numbers. 

At the end of the day the R owns the announcement and enforcement (especially if it his his foul) so there can be no excuses.  However, this really could happen to anybody.
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National Federation Discussion / Re: Help with this
« Last post by PABJNR on Today at 09:05:32 AM »
Itís a snap, itís a new series following a legal scrimmage kick. This was probably missed in editing when the tack on rule was added.


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National Federation Discussion / Help with this
« Last post by CalhounLJ on Today at 07:55:22 AM »
I may have been doing this wrong. If R accepts This penalty as a tack on, does clock still start on RFP? Iíve been starting on snap in this situation.  If itís previous spot and K rekicks, I agree itís RFP.


3.4.2 SITUATION D:

There are 55 seconds to go in the game when K11 punts the ball from a fourth and 10 situation. R1 catches the kick and returns 10 yards. During the down, but prior to the catch, K3 holds R2. R accepts the penalty.

RULING: After enforcement, the game clock starts on the ready-for-play signal unless the offended team chooses to start the game clock on the snap inside the last two minutes of either half. [3-4-2b(3)]



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So what happens when a team doesn't come back out in a timely manner to start the last 3 minutes? Do you just sit and wait for them? It's very likely that it has never happened, but at some point that is a USC penalty on the head coach.

Also, by rule, halftime cannot be shorter than 10 minutes which *does not* include the 3 minute warm up period. If you have a 10 minute halftime where the 3 minute warm up is the final 3 of those ten, then your halftime is only 7 minutes long -- in violation of 3-1-1.

If the teams are not in sight when the clock hits 3:00, then the wing officials go get their respective teams.  We have never (in a crew I've been on) flagged a team for coming out late for the 2nd half.  The halftime length is always part of the pregame discussion that the R+U have with the head coaches and the length of that time is based on their agreement.  That's worked OK all year and based on our guidance from the MIAA is fine with the caveat that we must have a full 3 minutes at the end of the intermission with both teams present on the field. 
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The only thing I can think of that might help here is to move away from announcing offense/defense (both internally within the crew and to the others via microphone). If you announce the jersey color, you might get less of these types of errors. Fortunately they are very rare, though.
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